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#138988 23-Jan-2014 23:43
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I have a router with typical DHCP IP range of 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.55

I also have attached to it a wifi Repeater that has a fixed IP address of 192.168.10.1

I can connect to the Repeater using wifi, and also access its settings that way, BUT cannot access the Repeater using an ethernet connection (the manual says one can).

Any ideas why?

R.

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  #973270 23-Jan-2014 23:48
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hardware?

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  #973286 23-Jan-2014 23:56
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Set your repeaters IP to an IP address outside of your DHCP range.

I'd recommend setting your DHCP range to 192.168.1.50 - 192.168.1.150 and using the lower IP's for static devices, if your router is 192.168.1.1 set the repeater as 192.168.1.2.




 
 
 
 




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  #973292 24-Jan-2014 00:21
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Michael, thanks for that.

I guessed the router DHCP server IP range setting would prevent a device using an IP outside those parameters as soon as I cabled the device to a laptop (no router involved) and had access immediately.

Is there some way of "telling" a router to accept an IP address outside the set range, or must any
cable-connected devices always conform to the router's IP range?

R.


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  #973295 24-Jan-2014 02:41
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Rickles: Michael, thanks for that.

I guessed the router DHCP server IP range setting would prevent a device using an IP outside those parameters as soon as I cabled the device to a laptop (no router involved) and had access immediately.

Is there some way of "telling" a router to accept an IP address outside the set range, or must any
cable-connected devices always conform to the router's IP range?

R.



Unless the device (such as laptop had a static IP not DHCP). If the repeater is acting as a repeater should, the laptop should be assigned DHCP by your main router. Otherwise your repeater would be doing something more advanced such as an Access point or Routing mode where it also had a DHCP server running - which would be messy and conflicting with the main router.

Connecting to it via Wi-Fi or Ethernet should make no difference if the repeater IP address is in the same subnet range as the device trying to connect to it, ie laptop was 192.168.1.5 and repeater 192.168.1.100 etc...  But as Michael mentioned, if it was 192.168.'10'.1, that's a different subnet and it would be ignored by devices in teh 192.168.'1'.X range.

Unless your repeater has some special function that only allows it to be administered from it's Ethernet interface only regardless of whether the IP addressing is sorted.


edit: Keep in mind, a repeater is the easiest way to extend a wireless network, but a repeater can also reduce bandwidth - as it takes time to repeat a signal, time other devices can't be talking to the repeater too at the same time. If you can run an Ethernet cable from the router to the repeater and put it in to Access Point mode and on another channel, then it could increase bandwidth/performance to devices on the main router's Wi-Fi etc...


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  #973319 24-Jan-2014 08:07
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Is the repeater definitely 10.1? if so you will never get to it by cable unless you set a static ip on ethernet in the 192.168.10.X range. Typical routers have a 255.255.255.0 subnet mask which will exclude anything outside of the 192.168.1.X range.




Try Vultr using this link and get us both some credit:

 

http://www.vultr.com/?ref=7033587-3B




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  #973351 24-Jan-2014 09:11
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Thanks for views and opinions, appreciated.

FYI I've now found -

The device can operate in either Repeater or AP modes.

The device can have its default IP address changed, so that would solve problem if incorporated into my overall network.

The device can be set as a DHCP server itself and not affect the router etc ... it must allocate IP addresses 'downstream' in the 192.168.10.x range because the laptop would happily connect to either it or the router via wifi.

Neat little unit ... does everything and more that an Apple Airport Express does but at a fraction of the cost.

R.

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  #973716 24-Jan-2014 18:01
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Rickles: Thanks for views and opinions, appreciated.

FYI I've now found -

The device can operate in either Repeater or AP modes.

The device can have its default IP address changed, so that would solve problem if incorporated into my overall network.

The device can be set as a DHCP server itself and not affect the router etc ... it must allocate IP addresses 'downstream' in the 192.168.10.x range because the laptop would happily connect to either it or the router via wifi.

Neat little unit ... does everything and more that an Apple Airport Express does but at a fraction of the cost.

R.


If its allocating DHCP addresses in the 192.168.10.x range then its acting as a router between the 10.x and 1.x sub-networks, which could cause double-NAT issues. It may be useful to have wifi on a different subnet, but the routing is better done by the main router where you may be able to set various options for each subnet. In this case you would be looking to set the repeater to "DHCP relay" addresses from the main router.

At the moment you will probably find the repeater gets a 1.x address that it uses for connecting to the main router.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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