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Topic # 150840 5-Aug-2014 03:28
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Hey guys,

I was wondering how easy it is to muck up terminating Cat 5 cable? I want to give it a go and should be able to have access to the tools I will need. I need to do approx 20 ends and don't mind it taking a while since it will be a learning exercise too (maybe even a painful one!)... How easy it for someone to pick this up? I'm not a complete noob at manual work, having got stuck in and built a a lot of my house but I assume this can be quite fiddly?

I also don't want to finish it and realise I have done it all wrong!

Also, am I right to assume when Telecom (or whoever) come out they also terminate the phone jack inside the house or do I need someone to do that (or me) myself?

Thanks

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  Reply # 1102295 5-Aug-2014 07:00
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It's easy. A fairly good crimper is about $30.

Use the 568a standard. Make sure the wires reach the end if the plug, and that the sheath is well inside the plug and held under the clamp when crimped.

Punch down blocks are easier still. Just use the correct tool and stick to the 568a standard.




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  Reply # 1102347 5-Aug-2014 09:15
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If you are crimping plugs on then have a look for the Dnyamix 2-piece plugs. They have a little insert which lets you get the insulation right up inside the plug and are just generally easier to use.

568A - Pins 1-8
White-Green
Green
White-Orange
Blue
White-Blue
Orange
White-Brown
Brown

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1102388 5-Aug-2014 09:52
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It is pretty easy, just get a decent tool that has the cutter for the outside sheath (that does not cut the wires inside).

Cat5E is slightly easier than Cat6, only because the wires are thinner. Once you have done a few, you'll be away.

Get a tester to make sure that they all working properly.

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  Reply # 1102397 5-Aug-2014 10:04
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chevrolux: If you are crimping plugs on then have a look for the Dnyamix 2-piece plugs. They have a little insert which lets you get the insulation right up inside the plug and are just generally easier to use.



I've never seen any 2 piece cat5e plugs with the guide - the cat6 ones do however as these are required. Using cat6 plugs for cat5e and vice versa is not recommended due to the different gauge copper.

The most important thing is to ensure you're using the correct cable and plugs for the job - stranded or solid depending on the requirements. There are some brands of RG45 plugs that will do both (such as some Tyco ones) but typically speaking they either do one or the other.





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  Reply # 1102421 5-Aug-2014 10:40
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trig42: ... Get a tester to make sure that they all working properly.


+1  Don't economize on this - buy a tester. Otherwise faults are very hard to trace.




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  Reply # 1102439 5-Aug-2014 11:03
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Cool, thanks guys - Ill give it a shot... and come back here if I screw it up!

The biggie for me is I don't actually have a tester so does anyone recommend one to buy? I don't mind buying one (unless they are super expensive).

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  Reply # 1102507 5-Aug-2014 11:53

There a few videos on Youtube that might be useful to study.

It doesn't matter if you use 568A or 568B, as long as you use the same standard at both ends of the cable. I find 568B is more commonly used in jackpoints and 568A for patch leads etc.

I got one of these testers...

http://www.darkstar.co.nz/network/network-tools/network-cable-tester.html


They are relatively expensive. But, it gives a simple 'beep' and readout if everything is OK.

With cheaper testers, you have to sit and watch pairs of lights flash. That is still quite workable though and you can get them $10-$20 approx. on Trademe etc.

Also, you will need

  ...an insulation stripper. These are quite cheap... around $10.
  .. a punchdown tool. Can range anywhere from $10 upwards. Needed for doing jackpoints.
  .. crimpers are only needed if you are making patch leads. You can buy patch leads pretty cheaply. So you may not need this.
  .. wire cutters are handy too.


Have a practice and test first.

It is something you tend to get rapidly better doing.

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  Reply # 1102511 5-Aug-2014 11:57
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You can buy cheap cable testers in Trademe for about $15. Don't waste your money they're absolute rubbish. The exact same testers are about US$4 incl shipping from Aliexpress (like this http://www.aliexpress.com/item/RJ45-RJ11-Cat5e-Cat6-Network-LAN-Cable-Tester-Ethernet-Test-Tool/1868342433.html)

If you want the best Ethernet cable tester around for it's price (you won't get anything better unless you're willing to pay $200+) get one of these

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/wholesale-SC8108-Network-LAN-Phone-Cable-Tester-Meter-CAT5-RJ45-Length-19734-Free-Shipping/1708311045.html

Lots of sellers sell the same hardware, I think the last one I got was about US$25

It's worth noting that 568A is the AS/NZ standard for structured cabling. Technically speaking you should use 568A in NZ, but providing you're using the same at both ends it makes no difference, and 568B is used by lots of people.



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  Reply # 1102513 5-Aug-2014 11:59
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The standard used in NZ is 568A. You can use anything you like though.

Edit: Steve beat me to it.




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