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Topic # 157602 5-Dec-2014 22:21
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Welp.

Internet was freaking out, couldn't connect to anything within the LAN and couldn't be arsed finding out why so rebooted everything first.

My switch doesn't have a power button or anything, its some blue, 8 port 100mbit thing, does the trick but is about 8 years old I'd say. My router is the same, a 4 port micronet. Both did their jobs very well... usually. I also rebooted everything like my computers and phones.

Well, I unplugged both plugs, left for about 20 seconds or so do fully drain them.

Plugged the switch in first, but I had 3 wires in my hand: switch, router, and my Cisco IP phones plug. 

Well we know what happened next...

I of course grabbed the Cisco phones plug, which is 48V IIRC, plugged it into the switch without realising and saw a spark but just assumed it was because it was on at the wall. Was holding it and waiting for the lights to go solid when I got the sound of a balloon popping in my hand, threw the switch to the ground and just about died of shock. Not literally though.

After I realised I dun stuffed up good, I plugged the router in direct to the modem instead and left the switch and phone unplugged. Thankfully nothing was plugged into the switch when it happened.

What I've noticed though, something is rattling around inside the switch now. What could it be? Was something blown off the board inside or what?

I've learnt my lesson though... Same plug does not = same power. 

Tune in next week to see how I nearly kill myself changing a DVD!




Bachelor of Computing Systems (2015)

 

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Late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display (4GB/2.4GHz i5/128GB SSD) - HP DV6 (8GB/2.8GHz i7/120GB SSD + 750GB HDD)
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Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 1189661 5-Dec-2014 22:33
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One can only hope your new employment is not in a technical capacity otherwise you might get to find out if your 90 day clause is valid or not :) 




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  Reply # 1189664 5-Dec-2014 22:35
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networkn: One can only hope your new employment is not in a technical capacity otherwise you might get to find out if your 90 day clause is valid or not :) 



How did I know this was going to come up :)






Bachelor of Computing Systems (2015)

 

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Late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display (4GB/2.4GHz i5/128GB SSD) - HP DV6 (8GB/2.8GHz i7/120GB SSD + 750GB HDD)
iPhone 6S + (64GB/Gold/Vodafone NZ) - Xperia Z C6603 (16GB/White/Spark NZ)

Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 1189714 6-Dec-2014 00:14
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I plugged the normal power cord into my router once (Netcomm NF5) And it Sparked, I was a bit scared for a moment, but it came on as normal.

I found it a bit strange because my ISP is Vodafone not Spark

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  Reply # 1189749 6-Dec-2014 08:25
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We were always told to never replug devices whilst power at wall was still on because the inner and outer poles could connect separately as it slides in and cause a short.

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  Reply # 1189751 6-Dec-2014 08:29
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Would have blown a capacitor in the power circuit (and probably more than that), most likely the remains of that rattling around 😄

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  Reply # 1189759 6-Dec-2014 09:20
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nutbugs: Would have blown a capacitor in the power circuit (and probably more than that), most likely the remains of that rattling around 😄


Years ago I shorted a 50V rail against the 3V logic on a board I was repairing (bad design- they were beside each other on the pinheaders). Anyway, the thermal expansion on one of the IC's caused the resin to pop right off over where the silicon was. I now had a little window into a non-functioning processor.

YMMV.




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  Reply # 1190156 7-Dec-2014 17:04
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It will be a capacitor for the inbuilt switchmode dropper to 3.3v that has popped off.

Might be ok without it. Is it totally dead now?




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 1190240 7-Dec-2014 21:31
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richms: It will be a capacitor for the inbuilt switchmode dropper to 3.3v that has popped off.

Might be ok without it. Is it totally dead now?


Seemed to work well when I plugged it in afterwards (with the proper plug this time :P ). But was too scared to leave it plugged in without me around it incase the house burnt down. Might run an extension cord and leave it running outside for a few hours tomorrow and see what happens, if the weather is right that is.




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Late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display (4GB/2.4GHz i5/128GB SSD) - HP DV6 (8GB/2.8GHz i7/120GB SSD + 750GB HDD)
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Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 1190248 7-Dec-2014 21:44
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I would still suggest replacing the capacitor as they are going to help the internal power supply run more efficiantly.




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 1190250 7-Dec-2014 21:46
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richms: I would still suggest replacing the capacitor as they are going to help the internal power supply run more efficiantly.


I imagine I'd need to learn how to solder or something?




Bachelor of Computing Systems (2015)

 

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Late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display (4GB/2.4GHz i5/128GB SSD) - HP DV6 (8GB/2.8GHz i7/120GB SSD + 750GB HDD)
iPhone 6S + (64GB/Gold/Vodafone NZ) - Xperia Z C6603 (16GB/White/Spark NZ)

Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 1190274 7-Dec-2014 22:57
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For sure will be a power capacitor.
Will probably be fine without it if its still working, but you would want to remove the remains that are rattling around, sat in the wrong place it could short something else out.

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  Reply # 1190286 8-Dec-2014 01:08
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Those remains might be a diode instead. A common trick in circuit design to get reverse polarity protection. (but without any volt drop) Is to simply wire a diode across the DC supply terminals. (But downstream of any fuses) Normally the diode doesn't conduct. But get the polarity wrong, The diode then shorts the supply. Either blowing the fuse, or putting electronic power supplies into protection mode.





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  Reply # 1191603 8-Dec-2014 14:24
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IBM/Lenovo used to send out replacement power supples with the voltage set to 110V (US)
I even saw one of there techs get caught out by that : POP
Its something I had to learn the hard way :-(


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  Reply # 1191610 8-Dec-2014 14:32
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Given you can buy a 8 port gigabit switch for less than $40 now.

Unless it was a really high end switch I would bin it and get a new one.




Geoff E

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  Reply # 1191612 8-Dec-2014 14:35
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1101: IBM/Lenovo used to send out replacement power supples with the voltage set to 110V (US)
I even saw one of there techs get caught out by that : POP
Its something I had to learn the hard way :-(



Ive done that, It does make a lovely pop. Almost as good as the time I accidentally plugged a molex connector in upside down to a running 386, That one ended in smoke.




Perpetually undecided.

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