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784 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 192019 24-Feb-2016 12:11
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Just decided to change my router's entry password and wifi access key and in the process, I spotted a bunch of unknown wireless devices.

 

Many have 192.168.1.xx numbers, so I guess these are mine, current and history. Some are recognizably neighbor's names, so no BFD there.

 

But there are few that don't fit either category, and it made me wonder whether there's any software that can identify intruders.

 

Obviously, a strong modem entry password, and a very strong wireless key would make for good security, but an app that tracks attempts to logon to my network would be useful.

 

 


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1271 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1498481 24-Feb-2016 13:52
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On some modems you can specify the level of logging you want. I believe the TG582n also supports multiple guest SSIDs so you may wish to enable that to distinguish between known group of users such as your neighbours (who from your post it seems you have intended to share access with?)

 

 

Not sure what you mean by many have 192.168.1.xx numbers, I would have thought all clients would be issued IP numbers on that range if it were the same LAN?

 

 

Also remember your household members/kids who know the passphrase may share that with their friends who come over etc..

 

 

 

 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1498671 24-Feb-2016 17:13
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 Thanks, yitz.

 

No, I don't share internet access with my neighbors. What I meant was that I could deduce from their SSIDs just who they were. Like, 'Mindy-PC' obviously belongs to a couple who live four houses away, because the wife's name is Mindy.

 

The 192.168.1.xx numbers will likely belong to various PCs that are either my own, or belong to customers whose machines were linked into my network at some previous time.

 

Re the passphrase\wifi key - it's most unlikely that anyone other than my wife or myself would know it.

 

My question was about software that could detect intrusions. I seem to recall I had something like this at one time.

 

Anyway, it's probably not that important now. I've replaced my wifi key with a randomly generated 20-character passphrase that should resist most hackers.

 

 


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  Reply # 1498684 24-Feb-2016 17:33
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so hang on those devises have SSID's? then they are not connected to your network, they are other networks in your area. SSID's denote wifi networks, not devices.

 

i would suggest you delete all devices you dont know from your routers DHCP list/pool except the ones currently connected/or you own, and see if any come back that you dont know about.

 

i highly doubt any of your neighbours have jumped onto your wifi network unless you left it unsecured.


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  Reply # 1498693 24-Feb-2016 17:49
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Sometimes those router generated DHCP lists don't list manually specified IP's so if someone was clever about gaining access to your network it wouldn't show there.




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1498947 25-Feb-2016 08:44
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Thanks, Jase2985. Yeah, that was pretty much what I did. I dumped every wifi listing, figuring the local SSIDs would re-establish themselves. Then I disabled wifi, so I could change the key while I was offline, but I found that I couldn't change the key while it was disabled. So I changed the router's Administrator password, generated a new wifi key, enabled wireless then patched in the new key. All good now.

 

BTW, I found a great password app - Awesome Password Generator 1.4. The portable version is easiest.


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  Reply # 1498955 25-Feb-2016 09:01
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was your password weak?


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  Reply # 1499021 25-Feb-2016 10:10
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Can imagine the "why is my wifi not working" calls to the spark helpdesk already lol

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1499067 25-Feb-2016 11:48
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If you are particularly worried and your wireless router supports SYSLOG you could install a freeware SYSLOG server onto a computer in your home network.




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1499068 25-Feb-2016 11:51
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Nathan, I don't think my password was weak, But just over the fence is a houseful of uncontrollable teenagers, all with tablets and computer smarts.

 

And their equally uncontrollable single father won't have a landline in the house.

 

So it occurred to me that I should review my broadband security.


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  Reply # 1499125 25-Feb-2016 13:17
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if paranoid

 

Disable WEP, WPA . Leave only WPA2 enabled .
Dont give out the wifi pass to anyone, incl your kids or spouse. Type it in yourself .
Dont allow access on any Win10 machines (theres a reason for that)
Turn the wifi router off when not in use (say late at night or during the day)

 

 

 

or , in reality.
Dont worry about it. Change the pass to something secure that cant be guessed, disable WEP & WPA.
I doubt anyone is trying to freeload on your wifi. Go into your neighbours house & see how useless your wifi is over there, signal is probably so
low thats its near unusable .

 

So unless you can see strangers sitting just outside your house with laptop in hand ... smile

 

 


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