Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


NZRobin

161 posts

Master Geek


#21260 21-Apr-2008 11:22
Send private message

Hi just trying to get my head around all these different plugs and connectors and saw this term used on sbiddle's "A beginners guide to DIY structured cabling in a new house - Part II". Hunted a picture on google and it looks like a RJ45 socket?

Thanks  Robin

Create new topic
willnz
573 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #125830 23-Apr-2008 11:31
Send private message

I've always understood that Krone connections were those types like the insides of phone jacks, you know where you use a little plastic thing to push the wire into a slot (or a professional tool that does the same job, but the retail chains love them little plastic things!Cool)

I could be wrong though - I don't care about these technical terms muchTongue out

maverick
3594 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
WorldxChange

  #125831 23-Apr-2008 11:36
Send private message

Krone is a Company that specialises in termination equipment, a lot of Cat5 and such so termination of cat 5 cables can be done to a Krone Jack which is where you plug your RJ45 connector into, the plate that covers this may be called a Krone plate, there are different types of companies and connectors that do the same job,  Krone was just one of the first and a common name in the industry 




Yes I am a employee of WxC (My Profile) ... but I do have my own opinions as well Wink

             

https://www.facebook.com/wxccommunications

 
 
 
 


richms
23684 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #126602 27-Apr-2008 17:26
Send private message

krone is also the tool used with telecom BT sockets and some RJ45 wall plates - most use a 110 tool which is not really interchangable with the krone tool, but the krone will get the wire in eventually with enough cursing and swearing. The terminals were mainly used on krone frames which are rows of slot terminals used to patch things before people started to do structured cabling which is why they chose them for the backs of BT sockets since all telco people had the tool already, whereas the 110 tool was not as common.

The common cheap wall sockets are whats called keystone, there are many things available to go into a keystone opening, like speaker binding posts, RCA, Svideo, fiber etc, but noone really uses them in NZ.




Richard rich.ms

Create new topic





News »

Vodafone enables 5G roaming - for when international travel comes
Posted 30-Oct-2020 15:03


Spark awards funding to Kiwi businesses in 5G funding initiative
Posted 30-Oct-2020 14:58


Huawei launches IdeaHub Pro in New Zealand
Posted 27-Oct-2020 16:41


Southland-based IT specialist providing virtual services worldwide
Posted 27-Oct-2020 15:55


NASA discovers water on sunlit surface of Moon
Posted 27-Oct-2020 08:30


Huawei introduces new features to Petal Search, Maps and Docs
Posted 26-Oct-2020 18:05


Nokia selected by NASA to build first ever cellular network on the Moon
Posted 21-Oct-2020 08:34


Nanoleaf enhances lighting line with launch of Triangles and Mini Triangles
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:18


Synology unveils DS16211+
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:12


Ingram Micro introduces FootfallCam to New Zealand channel
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:06


Dropbox adopts Virtual First working policy
Posted 17-Oct-2020 19:47


OPPO announces Reno4 Series 5G line-up in NZ
Posted 16-Oct-2020 08:52


Microsoft Highway to a Hundred expands to Asia Pacific
Posted 14-Oct-2020 09:34


Spark turns on 5G in Auckland
Posted 14-Oct-2020 09:29


AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors
Posted 9-Oct-2020 10:13









Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.