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21 posts

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# 212711 8-Apr-2017 14:05
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Hi Everyone!

 

I would like to create a router with a Raspberry Pi: but as you probably know, if you have Fibre/UFB in NZ (on Spark at least), you need VLAN Tagging (set to 10) the NTU ((whatever it is) set to the max (usually 1495 (woah there are a lot of brackets!))).  Also PCP set to 0, protocol needs to be PPPoE, and the Spark username and password.  This is from my list from when I called Spark up when I couldn't figure out my router settings undecided.

 

 

 

How do I use these settings?  Also if I have missed anything out please tell me!

 

 

 

Thanks,

 

Ben


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  # 1759474 8-Apr-2017 14:31
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It's not NTU, it's MTU, and it should be set to a maximum of 1500 or 1492 if you hardware doesn't support 1500.

 

Without knowing what distro you plan to use and a little more about your setup it's impossible to offer any other advice. The settings above are what you need to use - how you configure things is going to depend on how you plan to set things up.

 

 


Mr Snotty
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  # 1759500 8-Apr-2017 15:44
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A Raspberry Pi will not be a great router as it is a 100Mbit Ethernet port switched over USB direct to the CPU.

 

If you still want to try ensure:
1) You know iptables.
2) You understand performance will not be great and
3) You've got everything firewalled off correctly - be responsible.

 

The page you're looking for is here: https://wiki.debian.org/NetworkConfiguration#Howto_use_vlan_.28dot1q.2C_802.1q.2C_trunk.29_.28Etch.2C_Lenny.29

 

Now, if you're using Raspbian it uses dhcpcd which means you'll need to disable the interface in dhcpcd to use standard Linux networking support. Add "denyinterfaces eth0" to your /etc/dhcpcd.conf file and then edit /etc/network/interfaces to set everything up. You'll need to set up a PPPoE dialer to run over your VLAN 10 interface.

 

For a distro I'd recommend DietPi over Raspbian if you want the best performance. Bare in mind like I said it will not be great...





 
 
 
 


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  # 1759629 9-Apr-2017 00:31
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sbiddle:

 

It's not NTU, it's MTU, and it should be set to a maximum of 1500 or 1492 if you hardware doesn't support 1500.

 

Without knowing what distro you plan to use and a little more about your setup it's impossible to offer any other advice. The settings above are what you need to use - how you configure things is going to depend on how you plan to set things up.

 

 

Actually, you want to set the MTU for the PPPoE connection to 1508, if that is supported.  The fibre is overprovisioned so that you can do this.  The extra 8 bytes account for the PPPoE protocol overhead, so the actual connection you then get is the proper Ethernet MTU of 1500.  Not all PPPoE software supports MTUs greater than 1500 - it is a relatively recent change in the PPPoE specification.  If you are unable to set an MTU of 1508, you will likely have problems with IPv6 if you use that.




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  # 1759822 9-Apr-2017 15:55
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Thanks so much for answering.  What speed would it actually get to when the device tries to use it?  Also would it be better to consider an Asus Tinkerboard??  Since I'm still new around here I cant link it in, but it is https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SEVASU0001/ASUS-Tinker-Board-Quad-Core-RK3288-18G-Processor-a .  It has gigabit LAN, and from what I understand, goes about 125 MBPs?  Would it make that big a difference?


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  # 1759825 9-Apr-2017 16:01
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What are your reasons for wanting to use a Pi? It's not something I'd ever think of for using as a firewall as it's not really appropriate hardware for such a task. You're also left dealing with configuring everything in IPtables manually.

 

Why not use something more suited for it's purpose that can run a proper firewall distro? Or even something such a Mikrotik? A HAP lite doesn't cost much more than a Pi and is vastly more capable.

 

 

 

 


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  # 1759833 9-Apr-2017 16:14
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You can pick up an Ubiquiti Edgerouter X for less than a Tinkerboard and a little bit more than a Pi and that has 5x Gigabit Ethernet ports. I would strongly not recommend using any single board computers for this task unless if you know what you're doing as they're not designed for it and also the performance will likely be rubbish if you ever did so.

 

Like Steve says I am not sure why you'd want to use a SBC especially when there are vastly better options out there for the task.





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  # 1759836 9-Apr-2017 16:19
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I tried a pi and it couldnt even keep up with a 45/10 VDSL connection. And trying to use it to VPN into was horribly slow.





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  # 1759839 9-Apr-2017 16:26
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Benjour:

 

Thanks so much for answering.  What speed would it actually get to when the device tries to use it?  Also would it be better to consider an Asus Tinkerboard??  Since I'm still new around here I cant link it in, but it is https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SEVASU0001/ASUS-Tinker-Board-Quad-Core-RK3288-18G-Processor-a .  It has gigabit LAN, and from what I understand, goes about 125 MBPs?  Would it make that big a difference?

 

 

What would you use for the 2nd Ethernet port on either a Pi or Tinkerboard? If it's an Ethernet USB addon it's going to deliver pretty average performance.

 

 




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  # 1759846 9-Apr-2017 16:44
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sbiddle,

 

Use a USB Wifi adapter??  Yeah, hmmmm.  I might just go with the Ubiquiti...




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  # 1759849 9-Apr-2017 16:48
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The Ubiquiti sounds like the way to go.  I just wanted a Pi because I thought it would be a cheap way.  Thanks for showing me this.  Just a few questions though, does it automatically do the VLAN and stuff and how fast can it go?  Can I power it by PC (not a wall outlet)?  And does it mean I can use an Ethernet over power somewhere else in my house, I don't know why, I just have a feeling?


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  # 1759859 9-Apr-2017 17:17
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What is the actual purpose of what you're wanting to achieve? 

 

My assumption based on your questions is that you lack any real knowledge of networking so building anything as a Pi based solution which will require good technical knowledge and more importantly good knowledge of IPtables may be beyond you. An Edgerouter won't have wireless so you'll need to buy an access point to sit behind it.

 

If you want a cheap wireless router your best bet is to spend $10 and buy something off Trademe.

 

There are no routers that can be powered by a PC - all require POE or a 230V supply or plugpack.

 

 

 

 


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  # 1759860 9-Apr-2017 17:17
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Benjour:

 

The Ubiquiti sounds like the way to go.  I just wanted a Pi because I thought it would be a cheap way.  Thanks for showing me this.  Just a few questions though, does it automatically do the VLAN and stuff and how fast can it go?  Can I power it by PC (not a wall outlet)?  And does it mean I can use an Ethernet over power somewhere else in my house, I don't know why, I just have a feeling?

 

 

It can handle a gigabit fine. It can do power over ethernet, both as input and output. It does require you to put in time to study it properly in order to use it.

 

Can you tell us your use case? We might be able to figure out something easier and cheaper.




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  # 1759864 9-Apr-2017 17:26
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You are very right in assuming that I know very little.  I'm more HTML.  I was just wanting to have my PC connected all the time (I have Apache set up, but the only visitor I get is me).  My flatmates turn the WiFi off at night, so I wanted my own network.  If I did happen to want WiFi, I can turn the hotspot setting on, on my PC.  If it uses the Power over Ethernet then I assume it will be fine just plugged into the modem, then my PC.  I can figure out how to set up the VLAN and stuff fine if it is required.


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  # 1759938 9-Apr-2017 21:57
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Benjour:

 

The Ubiquiti sounds like the way to go.  I just wanted a Pi because I thought it would be a cheap way.

 

 

 

 

1) Simple.

 

2) Good.

 

3) Cheap.

 

 

 

Pick 2 ;)


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  # 1759969 10-Apr-2017 03:03
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Why not just run your own AP in the current router? Or does your flatmate turn off their whole router at night?


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