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Topic # 230714 9-Mar-2018 16:19
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I had a project setting up an outdoor AP, finally I managed to find a relatively cheap ENS202EXT. 

 

I set up wifi settings etc and put it away until installation day. 

 

However I have probably bricked this unit by using the wrong POE injector. Instead of the POE injector for the Engenius unit i mistakenly used the one for my dormant Xclaim Xi-3 (Rukus POE injector).

 

Xclaim power specs - 12V DC, 6.5W

 

ENS202EXT            - 24V / 0.6A

 

So I have used a 12V power supply instead of the original 24v one. Now when I connect the correct POE injector all i get is a flashing wifi icon, cannot soft reset or do anything else to get it working.

 

Probably I will have to bin it and look for another one, but was just wondering if there was anything to do to save this. 


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  Reply # 1972107 9-Mar-2018 19:32
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Actually the Xclaim PoE injectors output 48V. So that will be why you broke your engenius AP.

Also those Xclaim PoE injectors are not fully compliant with the official PoE standard. They just output 48V whenever they are plugged in.

I took advantage of this by opening mine up, and soldering some wires to the circuit board. I now feed 35V from a boost converter into my PoE injectors. And the Xclaims run fine from it. Meaning they are now powered from my 12V UPS system. The injectors still work from mains as well if needed.





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  Reply # 1972109 9-Mar-2018 19:38
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If you have used a lower voltage PSU then it shouldnt have bricked the AP. POE specs have the same polarity, so there shouldnt be an issue of reversed polarity.

 

A good POE ethernet device should have a blocking diode, and probably other protection - especially if there is a chance of over-voltage.

 

Try a new 12v PSU, unless you can confirm that the existing one is 100%. Cheapie  PSU's get horribly noisey, and inject crap power - it may look like 12v or something close, but has all sorts of nasty voltage hash.

 

Image result for switch mode PSU hash waveform

 

 





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  Reply # 1972110 9-Mar-2018 19:39
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Ahh, @Aredwood beat me to it - didnt realise that the POE is 48v!!!

 

 





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  Reply # 1972111 9-Mar-2018 19:49
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Aredwood: Actually the Xclaim PoE injectors output 48V. So that will be why you broke your engenius AP.

Also those Xclaim PoE injectors are not fully compliant with the official PoE standard. They just output 48V whenever they are plugged in.

I took advantage of this by opening mine up, and soldering some wires to the circuit board. I now feed 35V from a boost converter into my PoE injectors. And the Xclaims run fine from it. Meaning they are now powered from my 12V UPS system. The injectors still work from mains as well if needed.

 

Are you sure it's a non standard injector? None of the Xclaim kit I purchased actually came with PoE injectors (but it was an extra). All the AP's are standard 802.3af though, they're not 48V passive.

 

If it is 48V passive however it will have stood a good chance of frying the AP.

 

Standard 802.3af injectors are 48V but only output power to 802.3af devices unlike 48V passive which is immediate power on pins 4/5 7/8

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1972125 9-Mar-2018 20:13
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@sbiddle they are definitely 48V passive injectors. I traced out their circuit when I opened them up. The Ethernet part of their circuit is just an Ethernet transformer and the sockets. Was able to get 48V out of them just by chopping the plug off 1 end of an old Ethernet cable, and plugging the other end into the injector.

They came in the box with my Xclaim Xi3 AP's. I can get you the model number of the injectors later if you want.






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  Reply # 1972595 11-Mar-2018 01:17
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sbiddle:

 

Aredwood: Actually the Xclaim PoE injectors output 48V. So that will be why you broke your engenius AP.

Also those Xclaim PoE injectors are not fully compliant with the official PoE standard. They just output 48V whenever they are plugged in.

I took advantage of this by opening mine up, and soldering some wires to the circuit board. I now feed 35V from a boost converter into my PoE injectors. And the Xclaims run fine from it. Meaning they are now powered from my 12V UPS system. The injectors still work from mains as well if needed.

 

Are you sure it's a non standard injector? None of the Xclaim kit I purchased actually came with PoE injectors (but it was an extra). All the AP's are standard 802.3af though, they're not 48V passive.

 

If it is 48V passive however it will have stood a good chance of frying the AP.

 

Standard 802.3af injectors are 48V but only output power to 802.3af devices unlike 48V passive which is immediate power on pins 4/5 7/8

 

 

I'm no longer suprised by the number of supposedly quality PoE injectors that output 48V without any PoE device being on it, fortunately haven't bricked the expensive Fluke certifier yet but it does give you a warning bleep! Seems that you need a reputable PoE switch to be sure its fully compliant.





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  Reply # 1978381 16-Mar-2018 07:55
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Aredwood: Actually the Xclaim PoE injectors output 48V. So that will be why you broke your engenius AP.

Also those Xclaim PoE injectors are not fully compliant with the official PoE standard. They just output 48V whenever they are plugged in.

I took advantage of this by opening mine up, and soldering some wires to the circuit board. I now feed 35V from a boost converter into my PoE injectors. And the Xclaims run fine from it. Meaning they are now powered from my 12V UPS system. The injectors still work from mains as well if needed.

 

 

 

Wow, yeah I just checked the Rukus POE injector, it does state 48v. Well lesson learnt I guess but I am suprised and don't understand why the Rukus POE injector outputs 48v, and how the Xclaim unit is able to function on this voltage.


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  Reply # 1978452 16-Mar-2018 09:32
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Hatch:

 

Aredwood: Actually the Xclaim PoE injectors output 48V. So that will be why you broke your engenius AP.

Also those Xclaim PoE injectors are not fully compliant with the official PoE standard. They just output 48V whenever they are plugged in.

I took advantage of this by opening mine up, and soldering some wires to the circuit board. I now feed 35V from a boost converter into my PoE injectors. And the Xclaims run fine from it. Meaning they are now powered from my 12V UPS system. The injectors still work from mains as well if needed.

 

 

 

Wow, yeah I just checked the Rukus POE injector, it does state 48v. Well lesson learnt I guess but I am suprised and don't understand why the Rukus POE injector outputs 48v, and how the Xclaim unit is able to function on this voltage.

 

 

48V is standard active 802.3af POE. All proper Ruckus power adapters should be 802.3af and this is what all Ruckus and Xclaim gear works on.

 

There are some brands of wireless equipment that work on 48V passive POE which is incompatible with 802.3af and outputs 48V without any form of equipment detection before it applies the power. Some brands of equipment can work on both 802.3af and 48V passive, but some won't - and putting 48V passive into it will kill the equipment.

 

 


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