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7 posts

Wannabe Geek
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Topic # 245200 23-Jan-2019 13:11
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Hi, I am quite new to this forum and still learning the basics of networking.

 

I have reasonably new house which has a "network box" in the garage and my entire house is wired with LAN cables to a "CAT port" to a wall.

 

We are using SPARK as our ISP. 

 

Our current set up is that we have the fibre network to the ONT (huawei unit) that attaches to one of the LAN cable which is connected to CAT port in one of our room, which has a wireless router attached. 

 

Due to number of growing network devices that is clogging up the WIFI, we were hoping to have wired internet available to all of our "CAT port", so that we can have wired network to some of our big devices (TVs, 2 computers) 

 

I have tried attaching the LAN directly to the ONT and it didn't work.

 

Dear experts what do I need to do to achieve this.

 

 

 

Regards

 

John


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  Reply # 2166185 23-Jan-2019 13:14
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You will need to use a switch, Only your ISP provided router is the only thing that can plug into the ONT and work.

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/category/networking/switches

 

Plug the switch you buy from PB Tech into the router with a single cable then connect each device to that switch via cable. 





 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2166187 23-Jan-2019 13:16
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There are a few options. What does the "network box" in the garage have in it? Any chance you can post a picture?

 

One would assume that that the pre-wired cables come back to the network box and terminate into a patch panel of sorts or are they just terminated with RJ45 plugs?

 

Basically - You need to add a switch into the mix to distribute connectivity to the other pre-wired ports. If you have a picture - that would be super useful to helping.


 
 
 
 




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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 2166234 23-Jan-2019 13:21
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Dear Coil Thanks for your reply, does this mean that I have to bring the wireless router in to the "box".

 

If I had to to do that then I am worried that the WIFI signals may not be strong enough for some of our rooms.


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  Reply # 2166238 23-Jan-2019 13:24
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kojo7864:

 

Dear Coil Thanks for your reply, does this mean that I have to bring the wireless router in to the "box".

 

If I had to to do that then I am worried that the WIFI signals may not be strong enough for some of our rooms.

 

unless you have a second network port where your wireless router is, so you can send the LAN connection to the "box" then run a switch and distribute it that way, then yes you will need to put it in the "box".

 

you can buy an access point and put it at one of the network connection points to provide wifi




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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 2166240 23-Jan-2019 13:25
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Jiriteach:

 

There are a few options. What does the "network box" in the garage have in it? Any chance you can post a picture?

 

One would assume that that the pre-wired cables come back to the network box and terminate into a patch panel of sorts or are they just terminated with RJ45 plugs?

 

Basically - You need to add a switch into the mix to distribute connectivity to the other pre-wired ports. If you have a picture - that would be super useful to helping.

 

 

 

 

I will upload the pictures when I get back home but it seems to just terminate with a RJ45 plug, there are bunch of RJ45 just hanging there. 


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  Reply # 2166241 23-Jan-2019 13:25
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If there are two outlets on the wall where you have the router currently, one can feed from there back to your network box, where you put a new network switch to connect to any other outlets you need.

 

The alternative, is your router moves back to the network box (WiFi will likely be compromised though), and your wired devices can then plug into the spare ports on your existing router. If needed, you then buy a WiFi Access Point that connects to one of the outlets around your house to provide WiFi from a more central location.


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  Reply # 2166242 23-Jan-2019 13:26
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Hi, as others have mentioned, there are lots of options, but we probably need more detail of exactly what you have, so a couple of photos of the "network box" and the outlets in various rooms, is there just one outlet on each faceplate, or do some have two or more.

 

Cyril




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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 2166253 23-Jan-2019 13:33
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RunningMan:

 

If there are two outlets on the wall where you have the router currently, one can feed from there back to your network box, where you put a new network switch to connect to any other outlets you need.

 

The alternative, is your router moves back to the network box (WiFi will likely be compromised though), and your wired devices can then plug into the spare ports on your existing router. If needed, you then buy a WiFi Access Point that connects to one of the outlets around your house to provide WiFi from a more central location.

 

 

Sorry I am not very tech savvy, still learning :).

 

Most of what you are saying makes sense. 

 

Just one stupid question. What is a wireless access point? is it basically another wireless router? 


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  Reply # 2166262 23-Jan-2019 13:45
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its a wireless router without the router bit, it just provides wifi nothing else


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  Reply # 2166263 23-Jan-2019 13:46
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Hi, a wireless access point and a wireless router are similar but subtly different. The former is just like a ethernet switch but also has a wireless aspect, and all ports including the wireless are in the inside lan network and bridged. A router is the same but has the external WAN network and routes traffic from the internal lan to the outside. On a wireless router, the wireless and ethernet ports are all also in the lan and bridged

 

Cyril


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  Reply # 2166276 23-Jan-2019 14:05
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kojo7864:

 

Hi, I am quite new to this forum and still learning the basics of networking.

 

I have reasonably new house which has a "network box" in the garage and my entire house is wired with LAN cables to a "CAT port" to a wall.

 

We are using SPARK as our ISP. 

 

Our current set up is that we have the fibre network to the ONT (huawei unit) that attaches to one of the LAN cable which is connected to CAT port in one of our room, which has a wireless router attached. 

 

Due to number of growing network devices that is clogging up the WIFI, we were hoping to have wired internet available to all of our "CAT port", so that we can have wired network to some of our big devices (TVs, 2 computers) 

 

I have tried attaching the LAN directly to the ONT and it didn't work.

 

Dear experts what do I need to do to achieve this.

 

 

 

Regards

 

John

 

 

I read this a couple of times... so something to get started with:

 

1. The fibre comes to the ONT. The ONT is owned by Chorus (or Enable/Uff/Northpower), and all it does is provide 1 Active LAN port for you to use. In Sparks case, when they were retrofitting to old houses they would also connect one of the Voice ports back into the old house copper wiring, so you could continue to have analogue voice. I don't other ISP's do it this one.

 

2. Connected to the 1 Active LAN port on the ONT should be a router from Spark - the current model is HG659 (another huawei unit), which is used by several ISPs in NZ, with their own firmware build. There should be a cable connecting the WAN port of the HG659 to the active LAN port of the ONT.

 

3. The HG659 has a 4-port switch built into the back - they are yellow. You can connect these 4 ports to any of the 4 ports in your network box, but obviously if you want to connect more you need to introduce a new device called a switch, as others have suggested. This switch will connect to any of the 4 yellow ports on the HG659.

 

er, thats it. The above should be enough to get you going and confirm cables are working. 

 

 





________

 

Antonios K

 

 

 

Click to see full size


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  Reply # 2166305 23-Jan-2019 14:17
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This is effectively what you are trying to achieve. In a simple visual way.

 

 


You need to have that switch in a central location where all the cables that are around the house terminate to.
You then need to connect that switch to the Spark device. But the switch needs to be where the central point for all the cables is and the spark device needs to be able to retain a cable connection to the Chorus ONT and the switch.



 

 





 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2166309 23-Jan-2019 14:28
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One good place to find some diagrams that help explain the various options is Premises Wiring Guidelines.

 

If you look in the Full Installer Guidelines - Premises Wiring 1.7 MB PDF "Appendix 2: New Home Schematic Diagrams" there is a bunch of possible layouts.

 

Providing you have enough CAT(RJ45) outlets where you wireless router is Scenario 9 might work for you.

 

 

 

 




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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 2166318 23-Jan-2019 14:41
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Thanks everyone, it was very helpful.

 

I will head off to PB tech to grab a switch and a wireless access point.

 

Cheers !


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 2166326 23-Jan-2019 14:53
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How about POE? eg if you have a security camera somewhere on your network, you do't really want to also plug it into power, you want it powered via the network


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