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RGP



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Topic # 31108 4-Mar-2009 23:01
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Hi everyone - First of all a big thanks to all those who have posted replys to people like myself setting up a new house with phone and network. I have gone from intending to daisy-chain phone lines around the house to installing a patch panel and a phone distribution panel from Cyril7 - its been a big learning curve.I now have a couple of questions

Because I have run only one cat5e cable to a number of rooms I intend to run both phone and network from the one cable. A 2 rj45 keystone wallplate, one to termiate the two phone wires, the rest on the other rj45  keystone for the network. Ok so far?  Now, how do I  connect  the patch panel - a data/data splitter, a phone/data splitter or a double rj45 adapter or something completly different?
Would it be more sensible to pull another cable to each room, not impossible even though the gib is on as we have a high ceiling space and I have bored reasonably large holes down the wall.

Also, I intend to set up a wireless modem, however my patch panel cupboard is upstairs in a loft area and may be expecting a bit much of it signal strengh wise. I have another (non wireless) modem I could set up at the patch panel and put the wireless modem downstairs, say in the office. If this is the way to go, how do I connect them- patched together or each connected separatley  to the phone line?

Thanks
Ross

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  Reply # 199320 5-Mar-2009 00:29
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RGP: Would it be more sensible to pull another cable to each room, not impossible even though the gib is on as we have a high ceiling space and I have bored reasonably large holes down the wall.


yes, it would be more sensible.  100baseT only uses 2 pairs but if you want to run gigabit ethernet you need all 4 pairs and wont have any left to split to a second socket.




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  Reply # 199321 5-Mar-2009 00:31
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RGP:

Also, I intend to set up a wireless modem, however my patch panel cupboard is upstairs in a loft area and may be expecting a bit much of it signal strengh wise. I have another (non wireless) modem I could set up at the patch panel and put the wireless modem downstairs, say in the office. If this is the way to go, how do I connect them- patched together or each connected separatley  to the phone line?



connect the non wireless and the wireless with ethernet.  you wont be able to connect them both to the phone at the same time.




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  Reply # 199336 5-Mar-2009 07:36
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You talk about wireless modem but intend putting phone sockets in each room. If your dial tone provider will still be there when the power fails you will need at least 1 wired phone but apart from that I would use cordless phones.

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  Reply # 199856 8-Mar-2009 08:47
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Hi, ideally you should run a complete seperate run, othewise it gets messy.

NZ/AS3080 states you should have 2 RJ45 sockets per faceplate, however in domestic situations I recommend two per room but on seperate sockets, otherwise the room can start looking like a commercial situation, one has to be practical about what a home is. In bedrooms I normally run one to beside the bed and one on the opposite room maybe where the TV socket is or where a desk may be placed, however if you think you want phone and data then think how you are going to use a room and place two sockets on selected plates.

What happens in practice these days is that folk end up using cordless phones anyway, multihandset cordless DECT phones with builtin PABX features are far more practical and versatile than wired phones and dont suffer from coverage performance isses that can effect higher bandwidth WiFi data systems. So wiring data and using cordless phones with the ability for some wired phones if wanted is what normally ends up happening.

As for how to wire things if you should decide to service share certain cat5 drops, I normally site a krone block immediately behind or below the patch panel, ensure the cables you want to dual service are long enough and run the blue pair to the krone block. However in my view permanent dual servicing of drops is a last resort, as it prevents future deployment of GigE services.

Only this week I was called to a new home by a sparkie, walls were gibed, plastered and the painters were on their way out the door, the sparkie and the owner had not thought through what was needed and the owner realised he wanted on some drops both phone and data, so I ended up doing just as described above. Fortunately the sparkie had not terminated anything off (he had no idea how to sort it out so just left the cables hanging out of the wall) and there was only 11drops, 4of which needed dual service, so I placed a surface mount panel on the wall under the stairs where the cables all came to, installed a 12port surface mount patch panel and directly below it a krone block for the phone pairs, a 10way krone block offered both somewhere to terminate the line, install a filter and distribute phone services.

Cyril

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