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Topic # 128646 17-Aug-2013 21:48
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Does anyone know where I can get a 10 - 20 watt servo motor.

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  Reply # 880396 18-Aug-2013 07:37
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The Surplustronics in Auckland.




You can never have enough Volvos!




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  Reply # 881211 19-Aug-2013 20:18
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I was actually wanting a DC servo but it is kind of looking like there impossible to get and even if I did manage to find one they would be ridiculously expensive. Any suggestions of some thing that would do a similar job to a servo.

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  Reply # 881234 19-Aug-2013 20:56
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What sort of torque are you needing? Would a stepper do the job or not fast enough?




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  Reply # 881318 20-Aug-2013 04:28
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Stepper motors could be used as a servo. They are around $40 for a grunty one on Trademe


But like Richard said, would need to know some more details about it's operation.

http://www.omega.com/Auto/pdf/OMHT_Series.pdf details on motors



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  Reply # 881758 20-Aug-2013 19:55
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I am building a robot arm I have found that hobby servos just aren't powerful enough to lift more than about a 100 grams and I want it to lift more than that. I can get a servo with a torque of 24 kg cm which is pretty good but I was hoping to get even more than that. A stepper motor might work quite well if I can get one with high torque speed is not an issue it doesn't matter how slow it is. I am also considering pneumatic pistons although I am not sure how hard they are to get or how difficult they are to work with.

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  Reply # 881803 20-Aug-2013 20:41
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Steppers will be a much better option for what you are after. The torque characteristics are perfect for slower speeds that you tend to find in hobby robotics, and you will not need to gear them down like you will with a DC servo.

Precise positioning is easy with fewer electronics that a servo motor with encoder.

Plenty of stepper motors and driver boards on TradeMe




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  Reply # 881860 20-Aug-2013 21:55
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Pneumatics are useless for positioning since they will just travel to the limit of their travel at a speed based on the pressure you put into them. hydralics would be a better option if you need control of position rather than just force.




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  Reply # 883086 22-Aug-2013 22:30
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Is the physical size of the motor important? If space is not a problem the use the motor out of a fisher and paykel smart drive washer. They are a brushless DC motor. And come with rotor postion sensors already fitted.



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  Reply # 883590 23-Aug-2013 20:24
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Aredwood: Is the physical size of the motor important? If space is not a problem the use the motor out of a fisher and paykel smart drive washer. They are a brushless DC motor. And come with rotor postion sensors already fitted.


I think that would be over kill I don't know how much power they use but probably quite a bit I would have to run the robot off the mains.

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  Reply # 884388 25-Aug-2013 23:39
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If you only need the motor to operate at slow speeds then it will work on 12V. And maybe as low as 5V. You will only need mains if you want it to operate at 1000rpm or so. (the fast spin speed).



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  Reply # 884942 26-Aug-2013 19:45
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How big are they and where would I get one.

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