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563 posts

Ultimate Geek
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# 140666 17-Feb-2014 09:00
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Are there any (de)humidifiers out there that can automatically maintain a desired humidity range?

AFAIK most humidifiers just keep pumping out water effectively up to 100% humidity and most dehumidifiers just suck it all out of the air down to basically 0%.

I'm looking for something that will maintain a range between 40-50% humidity over about a 60m2 floor space?





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870 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 988676 17-Feb-2014 10:03
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Yes they do exist, but be prepared to pay more that the basic ones.
House sat for a friend last year and you could set a target of humidity in the house with the touch of a button. Maybe wait for the next Brisco's sale if you are in no rush



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Ultimate Geek
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  # 988677 17-Feb-2014 10:07
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knoydart: Yes they do exist, but be prepared to pay more that the basic ones.
House sat for a friend last year and you could set a target of humidity in the house with the touch of a button. Maybe wait for the next Brisco's sale if you are in no rush


Do you know what brand / model?

Was it a HRV-type system or portable plug in one (I'm ideally after plug in).





 
 
 
 


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Ultimate Geek
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  # 988680 17-Feb-2014 10:12
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It was just a plug in one.

I'll ask my friend for a make and model and see what they say. This one for instance seems to have what you want...



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Ultimate Geek
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  # 988685 17-Feb-2014 10:27
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knoydart: It was just a plug in one.

I'll ask my friend for a make and model and see what they say. This one for instance seems to have what you want...


Hmm... I'm a little skeptical about the "Adjustable humidity setting", as to whether it just sets how fast it dehumidify's.

For example my apartment tends to be mostly on the dry side due to A/C, would a unit like this actually then start humidifying the air or just stop dehumidifying? 





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  # 988695 17-Feb-2014 10:35
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This is starting to sound like a full on climiate control system you desire rather than a simple dehumdifer / HRV system.

In Wellington, the lack of humidity is normally never a problem. I'm no HVAC engineer but that device will not humidify if your A/C dries the apartment too much



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Ultimate Geek
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  # 988701 17-Feb-2014 10:45
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Plan B may have to be:

Humidifier + Dehumidifier + Netatmo + WeMo + IFTTT







563 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 988703 17-Feb-2014 10:51
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I've ordered a cheap hygrometer so soon I'll know whether the humidity ever actually exceeds my target max (i.e. after a shower / during cooking), if not I can probably setup with just an adjustable humidifier or the above setup minus the dehumidifier.





 
 
 
 


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Uber Geek
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  # 989166 17-Feb-2014 20:06
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The link above is what you get for consumer grade, and all you need for NZ. Our average humidity is around 80%. Auckland for example in December never goes below 90%. We have a Mitsubishi which is about 10 years old, bought when they came out as the first-to-market. It has 3 or 4 settings, from memory it is something like 60%, 70%, 80%, and a baby setting. Ours has a fairly large tank, the newer model is slimline and much smaller tank. Also the option to connect a hose to it so you never have to empty the tank. It will not increase humidity, only decrease. Ours have a compressor that will turn on/off, but also a fan that is speed controlled based on the humidity and off when humidity is low, start-up gently and was promoted as being quiet. You can sleep with it if you are not a light sleeper, or we just had it in the hallway outside our bedroom as it was a 2 bedroom house and kids with asthma. Also filters the air really well with a permanent, washable filter.

Too expensive to mail it, but if someone in Auckland needs one... We do not need it any more as we switched 14 months ago to an aircon and air transfer system (not venting outside, and not heat transfer, just air transfer, long story already posted a few time here).




You can never have enough Volvos!


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  # 989168 17-Feb-2014 20:10
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My Mitsubishi oasis has worked well for years and allows some control of the humidity level.

It's a top of the line consumer grade one, found someone on TradeMe selling it for next to nothing. Blows my Harvey Norman house brand one away in terms of how much water it extracts

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  # 989247 17-Feb-2014 21:53
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I also have a late model Mitsubishi unit and it's excellent. It has various different operating modes including one which allows you to set a target humidity anywhere from 55 - 70%. Previously I had a cheap Goldair unit which also had this feature, but I got rid of it mainly because it was too noisy.

I doubt you'd succeed in getting your humidity down below 50% with a portable dehumidifier, and the cost of the power to get it down that low would far outweight any benefits.

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  # 989360 18-Feb-2014 01:31
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My Mitsubishi Oasis allows us to set a target and it does maintain humidity in the target range. I've had a room down to 40% humidity but that's actually too low. I tend to go for 55%.

 

Mine is around 3-4 years old now and works like a charm. With my impending move to Canada its one of the things I will be selling so if anyone wants a really good household dehumidifier and can pick up from Palmy North, make me an offer I can't refuse. 

 

Ironically, we are going to have to buy a humidifier in Canada to put humidity back into the air. Seems a tad bizarre but dry winter air there is really painful. 

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  # 989390 18-Feb-2014 06:08
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Ah, yes, the Oasis, that's the one we have but the original fat model with a large tank. It is in our garage in dry storage (pun intended) where I can't see the model name. As said, mine is also available in Auckland if anyone needs one, will eventually put on TradeMe with a few other things like a through-wall aircon.




You can never have enough Volvos!




563 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 990176 19-Feb-2014 09:52
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Ok, so I made a few changes to my habitat which have created a noticeable difference in perceptible humidity and overall air quality.

1. Cleaned out air conditioning unit, ducting and diffusers.
2. Replaced air filter with a better one from safe.co.nz
3. Keep balcony doors mostly closed and air quality inside now far exceeds outside.
4. Rotated ceiling air diffuser so it's no-longer blowing cold dry air directly onto my bed but into the living area.
5. Purchased a whole bunch house-plants (mostly from Palmers) that have been proven to improve air quality and regulate humidity.
- 1x x-large Peace Lily, excellent air filter
- 2x medium Spider plants, good air filter
- 2x large trays of Money plants / Devils Ivy, good air filters
- 1x medium Bamboo Palm, gives of O2 during day & regulates humidity
- 2x large Snake plants (living area) & 2x small (bedside), gives off O2 during night & excellent air filter

See also:
http://www.ted.com/talks/kamal_meattle_on_how_to_grow_your_own_fresh_air.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_air-filtering_plants

Results:
1. Seen a drop in CO2 levels from ~450-550 to a min of about 300ppm according to my Withings Scales.
2. Humidity according to my hygrometer is stable around 60% which is very comfortable and reduces the perceived heat in the air due to dryness.
3. Significantly less noticeable dust
4. No longer waking up dry, with irritated respiratory system etc





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