Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




16487 posts

Uber Geek


#195695 29-Apr-2016 23:45
Send private message

Anyone know which Nest home automation products will work in NZ, or has anyone purchased some from overseas and got them working? Some of the things I am interested in looking at at the smart smoke alarms which also test for carbon monoxide, and their Nest cam security cameras.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
496 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1544385 30-Apr-2016 09:28
Send private message

I have  Nest Protect, ordered from Amazon.  Since it's smoke/CO2 it works the same as anywhere in the world, works perfectly.  The missus loves it, the talking alarm!  I don't have it integrated with any other Home Automation stuff though.


4215 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1544395 30-Apr-2016 10:07
Send private message

Domestic smoke alarm requirements

 

The New Zealand Building Code requires that all new houses and all existing houses undergoing alteration have smoke alarms installed. Domestic smoke alarms must be Type 1, which has:

 

     

  • a hush button so the alarm can be cleared without shutting off power (i.e. by removing the battery)
  • a test button.

 

 

Is the Nest compliant with the above 2 building code requirements? Looks like it has no test button.





Do whatever you want to do man.

  

 
 
 
 


D.W

598 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  #1544495 30-Apr-2016 14:06
Send private message

I have the Nest Protect, the button can be used to test.


3885 posts

Uber Geek


  #1544683 30-Apr-2016 23:11

Since Carbon Monoxide is heavier than air, A sensor on a ceiling is the worst place for a CO sensor. If you need carbon monoxide sensing, get a dedicated CO alarm and install it at floor level.








16487 posts

Uber Geek


  #1544691 30-Apr-2016 23:46
Send private message

billgates: Domestic smoke alarm requirements

 

The New Zealand Building Code requires that all new houses and all existing houses undergoing alteration have smoke alarms installed. Domestic smoke alarms must be Type 1, which has:

 

     

  • a hush button so the alarm can be cleared without shutting off power (i.e. by removing the battery)
  • a test button.

 

 

Is the Nest compliant with the above 2 building code requirements? Looks like it has no test button.

 

 

 

 

I believe it can be 'hushed' using the iphone app. In some cases that is easier than getting up to the ceiling to hush it. But not sure if this complies with the building code, and whether it needs physical buttons on it. Warnings about battery life IMO are a big advantage over conventional alarms.

 

 

 

The other thing I am interested in is their nest cams, which look interesting, and would be interested if anyone has them setup. The Nest temperature sensor thing also looks cool, but there doesn't look like there is any support for this type of system in NZ.


1819 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1544694 1-May-2016 00:20
Send private message

Hot air rises, that's why smoke/co2 detectors go on the roof and why the fire department says to crawl out of a smoke filled room.

2 posts

Wannabe Geek


  #1544753 1-May-2016 11:10
Send private message

Aredwood:

 

Since Carbon Monoxide is heavier than air, A sensor on a ceiling is the worst place for a CO sensor. If you need carbon monoxide sensing, get a dedicated CO alarm and install it at floor level.

 

 

I think you mean Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide is lighter than air!


 
 
 
 


1629 posts

Uber Geek


  #1548405 8-May-2016 21:06
Send private message

I have 9 smoke alarms at home, that means US$900+shipping if I replace them with Nest devices. They do look really advanced, but are they worth the money? I mean, they are something you buy but you hope never to use right?


406 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1549353 10-May-2016 16:04
Send private message

Make your own, way cheaper. You could even get several of each type you need to monitor and both assess each individually (to ensure the readings are within par - if one is way out maybe faulty so ignore), and if ok, then under normal operating circumstances average the readings from all of them. 

 

http://playground.arduino.cc/Main/MQGasSensors

 

I have an MQ-2 sensor here (Methane, Butane, LPG, Smoke) which I'm about to play around with on an Arduino board.

 

 

 

...and carbon monoxide (CO) is about the same weight as air so its always around us. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a lot heavier than air but I believe it depends on the temperature too.

 

 





 

 




16487 posts

Uber Geek


  #1549354 10-May-2016 16:04
Send private message

chimera:

 

Make your own, way cheaper. You could even get several of each type you need to monitor and both assess each individually (to ensure the readings are within par - if one is way out maybe faulty so ignore), and if ok, then under normal operating circumstances average the readings from all of them. 

 

http://playground.arduino.cc/Main/MQGasSensors

 

I have an MQ-2 sensor here (Methane, Butane, LPG, Smoke) which I'm about to play around with on an Arduino board.

 

 

 

...and carbon monoxide (CO) is about the same weight as air so its always around us. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a lot heavier than air but I believe it depends on the temperature too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although would that be reliable? The amount of time to make your own would also outweigh the cost I would have thought.


406 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1549358 10-May-2016 16:08
Send private message

mattwnz: 

 

Although would that be reliable? The amount of time to make your own would also outweigh the cost I would have thought.

 

 

I can't see why it wouldn't be as reliable as any other product if built and tested well - and hence why I mentioned a few sensors to poll, rather than just relying on one.  You could even add fail safe into it so if you used with your home automation system, it would alert you if the sensor wasn't available. These sensors are fairly simple to use.  Alternately, you could use it to supplement your standard off the shelf smoke alarms.

 

I'll build one as a test and see how it goes.  TBA!

 

 





 

 


406 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1549621 11-May-2016 08:35
Send private message

Very basic test but works ok. This particular sensor reads LPG, CO and smoke.

 

 https://youtu.be/WnxVcJcSMd8





 

 


626 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #1549829 11-May-2016 13:10
Send private message

The camera doesn't upload and save to the cloud in NZ - they've blocked it (however live viewing still works).

 

The smoke alarms are awesome - I have two hard-wired ones from Amazon UK (240V) and when you press the large button on the alarm it says "Press to test" so if you press it again it goes into test mode.


9 posts

Wannabe Geek


  #1552136 13-May-2016 12:33
Send private message

Hi,

 

Does that mean the Nest Smoke alarm will comply with NZ standards ( the physical button). I am planning to get 2 of those for my new home then i am not sure about the test button. Also is it the same for US and UK other than the 240 V.

 

Narendrn

 

 


406 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1563356 31-May-2016 22:31
Send private message

narendrn:

 

Hi,

 

Does that mean the Nest Smoke alarm will comply with NZ standards ( the physical button). I am planning to get 2 of those for my new home then i am not sure about the test button. Also is it the same for US and UK other than the 240 V.

 

Narendrn

 

 

I've followed the crowd and ordered a Nest Protect from Amazon UK myself.  They look too good!  I'll be supplementing to my existing smoke alarms, so not fussed if its non-compliant.

 

I opt'd to spend a bit more and order from the UK to get the 240V version.  Batteries are a PITA.

 

 





 

 


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51


QNAP integrates Catalyst Cloud Object Storage into Hybrid Backup solution
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:40



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.