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# 214202 1-May-2017 21:01
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As per the topic:

I've been working on a MQTT controlled but still reasonably standalone relay. I'm using my current version one (V1) to control my hot water and it's working pretty well.
I’m working on V2, which will add more features and better functionality.

Basically I wanted to put my hotwater on a timer, but wanted to be able to control it based on the power price in the future too.
I’ve ended up with a control system that would be pretty flexible with a few minor mods.

Currently running on an Arduino programmed Wemos D1 mini.
V1 has the following functionality:
• NTP time. With time zone and daylight savings correction.
• Weekly scheduling to the half hour level. (Mostly due to the way I store the schedule)
• MQTT control which can: Force ON/OFF , (anywhere from 1 second to years) , and force cancel. Change schedules. Change settings. Get status. More.

V2 is a work in progress (50% there) and will add:
• Storing and reading settings on an SD card. Settings Include: Wifi Settings. (password used and then deleted). Times settings. (probably). MQTT Settings. Default states
• Storing and reading schedules on an SD card.
• Logging to SD.
• Error critical messages over MQTT.
• Relay temperature monitoring.

V3 (May never happen) could add:
• A webpage for status, control and log downloading
• Scheduling to a minute level (Too hard to work out a reliable way to do this so far)

So, what do you think?
Anyone interested in playing with something like this?




Location: Dunedin

 


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mdf

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  # 1773852 1-May-2017 21:10
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Sounds very cool. I am slowly finding my way into home automation stuff. @SumnerBoy and @mattrix have helpfully shared with me their garage door advice and code. Once I've sorted this out (step 1: get around to soldering the header pins on the wemos board I bought quite some time ago), I'd be keen to work my way up to other stuff like you're doing.


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  # 1773853 1-May-2017 21:15
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Interested in it if you get the code running on a sonoff of some sort.





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  # 1773862 1-May-2017 21:27
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Definitely interested. My personal view is to make these types of nodes as simple as possible. So they simply respond to on/off commands, via MQTT, and report status.

Then my controller is responsible for scheduling and all control, in my case openhab.

This makes the firmware relatively simple and makes it easy to change, by updating the controller, not each node.

But i do see the value in your approach, for those that want a simple, standalone, device.



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  # 1773863 1-May-2017 21:27
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richms:

Interested in it if you get the code running on a sonoff of some sort.



Huh... never looked at them till now (seen them mentioned in passing once or twice). Should be pretty easy to mod it to work on that hardware, you'd loose the app functionality though.

Might have to buy one...




Location: Dunedin

 


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  # 1773864 1-May-2017 21:29
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ewelink is a pretty bad app, so no great loss not having it. I have flashed a few with some stuff a guy made for smartthings but it doesnt have any local timer on the device, so I am reliant on making silly rules on smartthings to turn things off etc.





Richard rich.ms



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  # 1773866 1-May-2017 21:33
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SumnerBoy: Definitely interested. My personal view is to make these types of nodes as simple as possible. So they simply respond to on/off commands, via MQTT, and report status.

Then my controller is responsible for scheduling and all control, in my case openhab.

This makes the firmware relatively simple and makes it easy to change, by updating the controller, not each node.

But i do see the value in your approach, for those that want a simple, standalone, device.

For the most part I totally agree with you.

My main reason for the complexity was the fact I'm using it for hot water, so it has to work, even if I break openhab.

A toddler in the house and no hot water = dad stabbed to death with his own hot soldering iron.




Location: Dunedin

 


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  # 1773869 1-May-2017 21:38
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Ha, i am in the same boat. God help me if the wife has to turn on the lights by hand! And yes, running out of hot water would be big trouble.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1774756 3-May-2017 09:11
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This sounds pretty interesting, how does your device connect to your hot water?


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  # 1774757 3-May-2017 09:14
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I'm assuming the WeMos connects to a decent solid state relay which just switches on / off power to the cylinder?
Then some sort of DS18B20 or similar temperature probe to read the temperature?

 

These are my fav solid state relay:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1AC/32699692440.html

 

Wide switching voltage.
I use one on my PC (USB 5V / Gnd)
So when I switch off my PC, it will switch off mains to some peripherals.


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