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246 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 31772 30-Mar-2009 11:18
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Does anyone know of a supplier for laptop cmos batteries?

I'm looking to buy a single one, the type with the wires and tiny plug and covered with heatshrink, not a standard (naked) CR2032 or what have you. I don't want to source direct from HP because it's not a warranty claim, and because by the time it arrives it will be sent in a box within a box within a box on a wooden pallet and a 100-page safety booklet in 97 languages. And it will be the wrong part anyway and have to be sent back for another replacement, and I'll get a followup call from customer service (in Australia) to survey me about my purchasing experience...
 Tongue out

I've gone to DSE, and some of my local PC shops (PB Tech etc) and searched Pricespy retailers online but no luck. I expect it should cost less than ten bucks. Can anyone point me to a supplier (preferably on the North Shore, Akl)?

Thanks in advance!

Cheers
Jon




I reject your reality and substitute my own!
- Adam Savage, Mythbuster

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  Reply # 204142 30-Mar-2009 11:30
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Or you could simply source a standard CR2032 or simlar battery and solder the wires on.

lol at the "safety booklet" we were commenting on that the other day when something arrived in a huge package, was a miniature circuit board with masses of printed material that was like the bible and a telephone book put together.



246 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 29


  Reply # 204150 30-Mar-2009 11:49
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paradoxsm: Or you could simply source a standard CR2032 or simlar battery and solder the wires on.


Mmm no. Soldering batteries is generally a Bad Idea. Plus, have you ever tried to solder onto a CR2032? Firstly, you don't know what the heat is doing to the electrolytic paste in the cell, and secondly, you need to pump a lot of heat into the joint for the solder to flow. (And I can solder to save myself, I'm guessing I've done over a million [solder] joints over the years)

lol at the "safety booklet" we were commenting on that the other day when something arrived in a huge package, was a miniature circuit board with masses of printed material that was like the bible and a telephone book put together.


The best one for me was installing a WAFS at a remote site, and the power cable came in its own box with a 60-page booklet!

Cheers
Jon

[edit for spelling]




I reject your reality and substitute my own!
- Adam Savage, Mythbuster

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  Reply # 204192 30-Mar-2009 14:37
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Yes it's not the most reassuring task but can be done easily, Super-hot iron (60-80W) and extremely brief application to the joint.

I put the battery on a wet cloth when I do it to dissipate a s much heat as possible., I normally get one of the PCB mount holders and slip the battery in that instead but they are bulky. See if there is a simple holder you can use or try holding two "battery" springs inside heatshrink then putting battery in centre and shrinking it. Won't be glamourous but would work perfectly.

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