Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




3 posts

Wannabe Geek


# 255575 19-Aug-2019 10:39
Send private message quote this post

I live in CHCH and thought it would be a good idea to get into network engineering (or something similar), considering there will be a lot of development here in the next 30 years.

 

However, my first problem is finding a job in IT and getting experience. I have a diploma in Computer Systems and Network Administration and done some IT support work but I am still having trouble finding a full time IT role. I am being rejected from helpdesk and IT support roles because I have too little experience and entry level/training positions are difficult to find. My plan is to get a full time job in IT and do part time courses to advance my knowledge.

 

Any advice would be appreciated, on how to get my foot in the door and finding a career path with the most opportunities. Cheers.


Create new topic
3872 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2301697 19-Aug-2019 13:21
Send private message quote this post

You seem to be doing the right thing, entry level helpdesk or IT support roles are the usual career starting point. Have you tried reaching out to your tutors from the Diploma, as they may have industry contacts that can help. Certainly the tutors I knew at ARA/CPIT when I worked there did. 

 

If you are not getting interviews, having someone look over your CV might help. If you are getting interviews but then rejected, having someone help you with your interview technique might help. 

 

 





Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.


2965 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2301730 19-Aug-2019 15:28
Send private message quote this post

Start out a little further it may count as the experience you need.

I applied for a service desk role years ago and got declined (among a bunch of other SD roles).
I then went to work at the 2degrees contact centre for just under a year, reapplied at the same role above and got it. Most of my colleagues were in telco support roles previously and a couple don’t have qualifications outside of high school. Experience goes a long way.

Depending on the role, a bit of technology focused contact centre work could be all they’re after, especially if the help desk/service desk role is mainly phone based.
For the one I landed a lot of the systems we support are very industry specific or in-house built, some are older than I am, so they would have no chance of finding someone with previous experience unless they worked in the business somewhere else. Training on the job in this case is required.

 
 
 
 


792 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2301761 19-Aug-2019 17:01
Send private message quote this post

The local uni/polytech will have a bunch of entry level IT jobs each year, I would go back to the person who ran your course and ask/network. Typically they have ICT industry meetups in most large NZ cities which help you get an idea of some local companies that are more receptive to hiring grads. Theres also the option of offering to work for free for a month or something if you are willing, you get some experience to list on a CV and hopefully a great reference if theres no job at the end of it. Theres probably even a local meetup.com group thats IT related.

 

 

 

Personally was in a similar spot, got sick of looking and ended up walking in the door of the local shipping company and asked for work. Ended up fulltime there driving forklifts, diggers and ship cranes lol. 




3 posts

Wannabe Geek


  # 2301830 19-Aug-2019 18:38
Send private message quote this post

Thank you all for your input. I guess finding the first gig is always the hardest. I was a bit unfortunate because after my course ended, the department was discontinued and the staff were let go. There was a generally bad vibe about the whole thing. Now they only offer software development courses.

Like you suggested, I will try to attend any meetups/conventions. I’ve had a couple of interviews that I thought went well, but experience seems to be the deciding factor. The importance of customer service experience was also mentioned. I know I can do it, I just need someone to give me a chance.

105 posts

Master Geek

Microsoft NZ

  # 2302230 20-Aug-2019 09:57
Send private message quote this post

Adrian512: Thank you all for your input. I guess finding the first gig is always the hardest. I was a bit unfortunate because after my course ended, the department was discontinued and the staff were let go. There was a generally bad vibe about the whole thing. Now they only offer software development courses.

Like you suggested, I will try to attend any meetups/conventions. I’ve had a couple of interviews that I thought went well, but experience seems to be the deciding factor. The importance of customer service experience was also mentioned. I know I can do it, I just need someone to give me a chance.

 

See if you can have a chat with Lucy from The IT Team, Craig or Kevin from Computer Culture. Both are SMB-oriented managed service providers that might be interested in taking on eager talent. I worked with Computer Culture for our FY19 and they'd be a good bet if you're looking to skill up and develop a career around Microsoft cloud.


337 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2302303 20-Aug-2019 11:12
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Adrian512: Thank you all for your input. I guess finding the first gig is always the hardest. I was a bit unfortunate because after my course ended, the department was discontinued and the staff were let go. There was a generally bad vibe about the whole thing. Now they only offer software development courses.

Like you suggested, I will try to attend any meetups/conventions. I’ve had a couple of interviews that I thought went well, but experience seems to be the deciding factor. The importance of customer service experience was also mentioned. I know I can do it, I just need someone to give me a chance.

 

A lot of us have been in your shoes, and the important thing is not to let it get you down. Apply for every single job that is directly or indirectly related (call center?). Any sort of role where you can demonstrate the same sort of technical skills, and as you have also found, soft skills like communication, teamwork etc. Even if you get 100 rejection emails (or more likely 1 or 2 out of every 100), it only takes 1 employer to give you that chance. And every interview that isn't successful is still a chance to learn and get your name out there. If you aren't already, make sure to follow up any rejections with the employer with questions like 'what could I do to improve my application for next time?'.

 

If you don't already, look at taking up some small tech-y projects in your spare time, like learning a scripting/programming language (python, javascript etc) or creating a thing with an Arduino/Raspberry Pi. You may even find user groups as others have suggested through the likes of meetup.com etc that allow you to expand your network. Have a look here and see if there is anything that peaks your interest.

 

Using these sort of events IRL for a bit of networking is a great way to get a foot in the door, because if it comes down to you and another person, everything and anything counts for getting that whisker ahead. Especially if the interviewers can say things like "Oh, I met that person once at a meetup, they are eager to learn and seem like they would be a great fit". It's much easier to give someone with no experience but a good attitude training, than it is to teach someone not to be a dick or not to have a sh!tty attitude.

 

Good luck!


48 posts

Geek


  # 2302443 20-Aug-2019 17:11
Send private message quote this post

If you're young, some feedback i got from an interview once was i was 'too ambitious'.  I think they have a real fear (justified) that millennials will either demand a substantial position within 2 years or leave.  I started making a habit in my interviews to say "i'm keen to really build a good baseline of skills and learning products and expanding knowledge on that".  Sometimes jobs really are just looking for an ass on a seat/number to build up the ranks in the team.

 

Also have you been told by HR that you have too little experience or that your own assumption?  Sometimes expectations of requirements is a bit over the top as its written by HR who just get told various functions expected to put on the paper, so it can come out unreasonable.  If you have a cover letter / resume that really shows that although you lack experience, you have a strong understanding of theory because of your study and you have a real drive to learn that can always beat experience for entry level.  The hardest part is conveying the above though, so make sure you have a nice clear CV.

 

 

 

Best of luck!  Can be frustrating and job hunting out of uni is the worst time in your life to be job hunting, but keep at it, keep busy and learn new skills in the interim that can help and you'll get there.


 
 
 
 




3 posts

Wannabe Geek


  # 2302584 20-Aug-2019 19:55
Send private message quote this post

Jogre:

 

See if you can have a chat with Lucy from The IT Team, Craig or Kevin from Computer Culture. Both are SMB-oriented managed service providers that might be interested in taking on eager talent. I worked with Computer Culture for our FY19 and they'd be a good bet if you're looking to skill up and develop a career around Microsoft cloud.

 

Thanks, I'll give those a try. They seem like they're willing to take on someone new.

 

ShinyChrome:

 

A lot of us have been in your shoes, and the important thing is not to let it get you down. Apply for every single job that is directly or indirectly related (call center?). Any sort of role where you can demonstrate the same sort of technical skills, and as you have also found, soft skills like communication, teamwork etc. Even if you get 100 rejection emails (or more likely 1 or 2 out of every 100), it only takes 1 employer to give you that chance. And every interview that isn't successful is still a chance to learn and get your name out there. If you aren't already, make sure to follow up any rejections with the employer with questions like 'what could I do to improve my application for next time?'.

 

If you don't already, look at taking up some small tech-y projects in your spare time, like learning a scripting/programming language (python, javascript etc) or creating a thing with an Arduino/Raspberry Pi. You may even find user groups as others have suggested through the likes of meetup.com etc that allow you to expand your network. Have a look here and see if there is anything that peaks your interest.

 

Using these sort of events IRL for a bit of networking is a great way to get a foot in the door, because if it comes down to you and another person, everything and anything counts for getting that whisker ahead. Especially if the interviewers can say things like "Oh, I met that person once at a meetup, they are eager to learn and seem like they would be a great fit". It's much easier to give someone with no experience but a good attitude training, than it is to teach someone not to be a dick or not to have a sh!tty attitude.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Yes, I'm aiming for 100 applications sent and I have been applying for pretty much anything that's related and beats my current job which is about 70/30% storeman/IT. My weakness is definitely my social network. I hardly know anyone in the industry who could give me an opportunity. Funny that you mentioned home projects because I have been dabbling with Python, trying to make something resembling an AI, with varying results!

 

timbee:

 

If you're young, some feedback i got from an interview once was i was 'too ambitious'.  I think they have a real fear (justified) that millennials will either demand a substantial position within 2 years or leave.  I started making a habit in my interviews to say "i'm keen to really build a good baseline of skills and learning products and expanding knowledge on that".  Sometimes jobs really are just looking for an ass on a seat/number to build up the ranks in the team.

 

Also have you been told by HR that you have too little experience or that your own assumption?  Sometimes expectations of requirements is a bit over the top as its written by HR who just get told various functions expected to put on the paper, so it can come out unreasonable.  If you have a cover letter / resume that really shows that although you lack experience, you have a strong understanding of theory because of your study and you have a real drive to learn that can always beat experience for entry level. The hardest part is conveying the above though, so make sure you have a nice clear CV.

 

Best of luck!  Can be frustrating and job hunting out of uni is the worst time in your life to be job hunting, but keep at it, keep busy and learn new skills in the interim that can help and you'll get there.

 

Well the last two jobs I was turned down from specifically mentioned lack of experience. All up I have about a year of experience in IT but most of it is practical - setting up desktop stations, upgrading/updating, running wires etc. Like you said, my interviews may need improvement. I try to make it clear that I'm willing to go the extra mile to get into the groove of things, even if it means sacrificing my free time. (although I never mention my "lack of experience", I only focus on the positives).

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice. It helps to get different perspectives and ideas. I'm looking at doing a network engineering course in the evenings at CPP while working. It may help show my commitment as I continue searching.


Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Microsoft New Zealand Partner Awards results
Posted 18-Oct-2019 10:18


Logitech introduces new Made for Google keyboard and mouse devices
Posted 16-Oct-2019 13:36


MATTR launches to accelerate decentralised identity
Posted 16-Oct-2019 10:28


Vodafone X-Squad powers up for customers
Posted 16-Oct-2019 08:15


D Link ANZ launches EXO Smart Mesh Wi Fi Routers with McAfee protection
Posted 15-Oct-2019 11:31


Major Japanese retailer partners with smart New Zealand technology IMAGR
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:29


Ola pioneers one-time passcode feature to fight rideshare fraud
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:24


Spark Sport new home of NZC matches from 2020
Posted 10-Oct-2019 09:59


Meet Nola, Noel Leeming's new digital employee
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:07


Registrations for Sprout Accelerator open for 2020 season
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:02


Teletrac Navman welcomes AI tech leader Jens Meggers as new President
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:41


Vodafone makes voice of 4G (VoLTE) official
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:36


2degrees Reaches Milestone of 100,000 Broadband Customers
Posted 1-Oct-2019 09:17


Nokia 1 Plus available in New Zealand from 2nd October
Posted 30-Sep-2019 17:46


Ola integrates Apple Pay as payment method in New Zealand
Posted 25-Sep-2019 09:51



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.