Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


52 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 5


Topic # 159762 11-Dec-2014 21:49
Send private message

My latest plan to get something like UFB speed instead of our 3MBs ADSL is a pair of NanoBeams covering a distance of about 1km. Our neighbour has a 12m pole he's happy for us to mount it on so hopefully we can get reasonable LOS.

However, I read that in Australia it's possibly illegal to send telecommunications between two locations without a licence, or something. Does anyone know if it's entirely legit for me to:

* pay for some random person's UFB internet about 1KM away
* allow them free use of it, in exchange for an antenna on their roof pointing at me

Anything I should be wary of?

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
3238 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 847


  Reply # 1195899 11-Dec-2014 22:02
Send private message

All countries have strange and bizarre laws',

but I 'm pretty sure there is nothing in NZ to stop you doing what you are planning...

Points to point wifi is pretty common, esp as a rural solution


2525 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1181


  Reply # 1195915 11-Dec-2014 22:13
Send private message

You should be OK, as long as the kit you are using doesn't break any of the transmission rules - the frequency it uses, transmission power etc.

If in doubt, write/email the Government spectrum licensing people and ask them what the rules are. They ought to be able to tell you.

26772 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6249

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1195924 11-Dec-2014 22:40
Send private message

Providing you company with relevant laws regarding power limits there is nothing illegal about it. It's also not illegal in Australia either.


3215 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 620

Trusted

  Reply # 1196515 12-Dec-2014 19:05
Send private message

You are right that australia does have a telecommunications licence system.
I dont know the exact legal requirements but I do know that ISP's or providers of internet access are required to register, seperate from the isp's business registration.

In NZ, anyone can be a telco without registering anything.

So you may want to double check to find out what the requirements are if you are in Australia and at what point you become a telco - you may not even need to be a business to be a telco. South Africa is quite restrictive too.

Anyhow you will probably find its simpler than we think.

Some industries require this sort of process - much like in NZ if you want to install a security camera, or alarm system, you need to be a registered security tech - and that is the person, not the company they work for.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 285


  Reply # 1196519 12-Dec-2014 19:12
3 people support this post
Send private message

Australia is crazy. You can't run data cable inside your own house.

NZ is thankfully not that crazy. You will be fine.

I share my UFB with a neighbour. We split the bill. At some stage I will have a go at providing free internet to our street.

The only worries I would have are around access to the router etc if it breaks while your neighbour is on holiday. And liability for copyright infringement.

3215 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 620

Trusted

  Reply # 1196520 12-Dec-2014 19:15
Send private message

Actually sorry I am wrong.
We do now have a registration system - TICSA and the police as of this year.
Anyone providing a telecommunications service needs to be registered and meet the requirements.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 285


  Reply # 1196522 12-Dec-2014 19:20
Send private message

raytaylor: Actually sorry I am wrong.
We do now have a registration system - TICSA and the police as of this year.
Anyone providing a telecommunications service needs to be registered and meet the requirements.


Does TICSA apply at any size? Does the local Cafe providing free wifi have to register?

Bloody stupid system if you ask me but when the two major political parties join forces to give the GCSB and friends everything on their Christmas list, this is what we get.

Mad Scientist
18697 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2380

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1196545 12-Dec-2014 19:59
Send private message

Can't run data cable in the house?

854 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 125


  Reply # 1196546 12-Dec-2014 20:08
Send private message

joker97: Can't run data cable in the house?


I heard they relaxed that rule (as far as 'last meter' ethernet cabling goes), but they still have the (as far as I've heard) any telecommunications cabling connected direct to telecom-network must be done by a sparkie/other qualified person rule.

O.P. As long as you comply with the RSM rules for open-use spectrum my understanding is that you shouldn't have a problem.

http://www.rsm.govt.nz/about-rsm/spectrum-policy/gazette/gurl/short-range-devices may be a worthwhile read, also defines max-power etc for various frequencies.

Edit:  This one may be more useful....

Any person may transmit radio waves using Fixed Radio Link Devices, including those known as U-NII devices, using digital modulation techniques to typically provide high data rate fixed point-to-point communications for individuals, businesses and institutions, in accordance with the applicable terms, conditions and restrictions of this notice.


http://www.rsm.govt.nz/about-rsm/spectrum-policy/gazette/gurl/fixed-radio-link-devices

15 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1196630 12-Dec-2014 22:09
Send private message

Hey, I honestly doubt you'll run into issue with this.

NanoBeams should be perfectly legal, they run in the standard WiFi spectrum at acceptable limits.

The only thing that is border line is the ISP itself, most do not allow sharing of an internet connection, however I doubt they'll pull you up on it.

Good luck, I hope to do the same thing once the area near me gets connected to UFB. 

21287 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4296

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1196637 12-Dec-2014 22:31
4 people support this post
Send private message

You are extending your lan, not providing a telecommunication service.




Richard rich.ms

6434 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1571


  Reply # 1196669 13-Dec-2014 00:20
4 people support this post
Send private message

It's almost certianly against the ts and cs of the ISP to share a connection in this manner, so you could argue it's immoral to breach the ts and cs.
However if you are the kind of person who is ok with watching netflix illegitimately, then you should be ok with this too.

21287 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4296

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1196672 13-Dec-2014 00:37
3 people support this post
Send private message

How is it different to when people share a connection in a flat? Thats not a problem for ISP's




Richard rich.ms

467 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 100


  Reply # 1196678 13-Dec-2014 02:44
Send private message

richms: How is it different to when people share a connection in a flat? Thats not a problem for ISP's
They do reside within the same dwelling though. So that's a pretty big difference...

895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 285


  Reply # 1196695 13-Dec-2014 08:31
Send private message

NonprayingMantis: It's almost certianly against the ts and cs of the ISP to share a connection in this manner, so you could argue it's immoral to breach the ts and cs.
However if you are the kind of person who is ok with watching netflix illegitimately, then you should be ok with this too.


I've read my ISPs T&Cs and haven't found anything that I could interpret as meaning "no sharing."

Snap have a clause saying "no reselling without written consent from us" but I don't know if sharing counts as reselling, or if reselling is on selling am entire connection. This doesn't matter to me because I'm not a Snap customer.

 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Intel introduces new NUC kits and NUC mini PCs
Posted 16-Aug-2018 11:03


The Warehouse leaps into the AI future with Google
Posted 15-Aug-2018 17:56


Targus set sights on enterprise and consumer growth in New Zealand
Posted 13-Aug-2018 13:47


Huawei to distribute nova 3i in New Zealand
Posted 9-Aug-2018 16:23


Home robot Vector to be available in New Zealand stores
Posted 9-Aug-2018 14:47


Panasonic announces new 2018 OLED TV line up
Posted 7-Aug-2018 16:38


Kordia completes first live 4K TV broadcast
Posted 1-Aug-2018 13:00


Schools get safer and smarter internet with Managed Network Upgrade
Posted 30-Jul-2018 20:01


DNC wants a safer .nz in the coming year
Posted 26-Jul-2018 16:08


Auldhouse becomes an AWS Authorised Training Delivery Partner in New Zealand
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:55


Rakuten Kobo launches Kobo Clara HD entry level reader
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:44


Kiwi team reaches semi-finals at the Microsoft Imagine Cup
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:38


KidsCan App to Help Kiwi Children in Need
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:32


FUJIFILM announces new high-performance lenses
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:57


New FUJIFILM XF10 introduces square mode for Instagram sharing
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:44



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.