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Topic # 86794 13-Jul-2011 21:32
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I have been assuming that its the start of September that they will be starting to monitor the swarms and send the complaints to the ISPs.

But read somewhere else that its actually the 21 days prior that they can complain about on the first of September?

Anyone know which it is?




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  Reply # 493143 13-Jul-2011 23:47
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I heard that most ISP wont have there processes in place by September as it's taken the government so long to release the details.

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  Reply # 493146 14-Jul-2011 00:04
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the rights holders have to pay $25 per complaint, so very unlikely to be swarms

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 493171 14-Jul-2011 06:21
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hellonearthisman: I heard that most ISP wont have there processes in place by September as it's taken the government so long to release the details.


They have no choise. The law is the law.


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  Reply # 493353 14-Jul-2011 14:04
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sbiddle:
hellonearthisman: I heard that most ISP wont have there processes in place by September as it's taken the government so long to release the details.


They have no choise. The law is the law.


Couldn't they request an extension or something, they could hardly rush though a process at extra cost when the government has already cut there budgeted costs from $40/notice to $25/notice.

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  Reply # 493358 14-Jul-2011 14:10
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I believe the process will be manual to begin with.

There will be massive problems in the first year or two, but eventually the system will be automated to some degree of usefulness.

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  Reply # 494313 17-Jul-2011 15:28
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Where in the law does it say what will happen to ISP who just shred it all? The Act covers what will happen to the account holder but nothing about if the ISP doesn't comply.

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  Reply # 495859 20-Jul-2011 18:06
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One of the ISP was saying they estimate the total cost of compliance at something like $79 per complaint, think it was Orcon. They are all having to take on new staff to handle it, telecom said they need a team of 19 people dedicated to processing copyright complaints.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 495861 20-Jul-2011 18:11
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Anybody got their proxy already setup in a china yet? I saw advertising for a bittorrent proxy service in Canada a while ago, was like $15 a month.

Note: I'm not suggesting that people do anything to break the law, but the law is creating a system that encourages people to do that instead of encouraging innovation in content marketing/delivery.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^



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  Reply # 495862 20-Jul-2011 18:19
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webwat: Anybody got their proxy already setup in a china yet? I saw advertising for a bittorrent proxy service in Canada a while ago, was like $15 a month.

Note: I'm not suggesting that people do anything to break the law, but the law is creating a system that encourages people to do that instead of encouraging innovation in content marketing/delivery.


Why would you put it in china? they have the most hostile internet of anywhere.

I am just sticking to torrenting on my seedbox in Luxemborgh which also provides fee openvpn. 16 euro a month and it lets me store 600 gigs on it, no traffic limit too.




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  Reply # 496054 21-Jul-2011 05:04
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webwat: One of the ISP was saying they estimate the total cost of compliance at something like $79 per complaint, think it was Orcon. They are all having to take on new staff to handle it, telecom said they need a team of 19 people dedicated to processing copyright complaints.

I heard that too, I think it was Oracle figure for setting up a process to manage the notices.
Orcon quoted the Government $77. Massive hit to ISP's It looks like they are guilty and it will cost them with every accusation made.

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  Reply # 496187 21-Jul-2011 11:43
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Complete waste of time and money for everyone involved.

If the content owners/providers would just get it through their thick brains that if they offer timely, convenient and fairly priced digital distribution for tv and movies people would be all over it.

Refer to: Steam, itunes, Spotify, Amazon Kindle

The only way to beat piracy is to out compete it with a better product/service. 

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  Reply # 496192 21-Jul-2011 11:59
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Ragnor: Complete waste of time and money for everyone involved.

If the content owners/providers would just get it through their thick brains that if they offer timely, convenient and fairly priced digital distribution for tv and movies people would be all over it.

Refer to: Steam, itunes, Spotify, Amazon Kindle

The only way to beat piracy is to out compete it with a better product/service. 


you are absolutely right.
Nobody pirates games anymore now that Steam has them available for direct download.

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  Reply # 496194 21-Jul-2011 12:00
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richms:
webwat: Anybody got their proxy already setup in a china yet? I saw advertising for a bittorrent proxy service in Canada a while ago, was like $15 a month.

Note: I'm not suggesting that people do anything to break the law, but the law is creating a system that encourages people to do that instead of encouraging innovation in content marketing/delivery.


Why would you put it in china? they have the most hostile internet of anywhere.

I am just sticking to torrenting on my seedbox in Luxemborgh which also provides fee openvpn. 16 euro a month and it lets me store 600 gigs on it, no traffic limit too.


Which provider are you using richms?




When you live your life on Twitter and Facebook, and are only friends with like minded people on Twitter and Facebook, you are not living in the real world. You are living in a narcissistic echo chamber.

 


My thoughts are my own and are in no way representative of my employer.


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  Reply # 496195 21-Jul-2011 12:00
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Interesting twist:


Scope of copyright law changes limited to P2P file sharing
InternetNZ (Internet New Zealand Inc) has obtained clarification from the Ministry of Economic Development (MED) that the intention of the Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Act 2011 is to cover copyright infringement by online file sharing using peer-to-peer protocols only.

The new notices and penalty regime introduced by these amendments is not intended to cover video/music streaming websites or online file lockers.
InternetNZ Chief Executive Vikram Kumar says, “What this means is that watching videos on YouTube or via blinkx, streaming music from Grooveshark, and downloading from online file lockers like MediaFire and 4shared will not be subject to the changes introduced by the amendments to the law coming into force on 1 September 2011. MED’s confirmation addresses some of the questions that arose when we were looking at the law changes in detail”.

“It keeps the scope of the changes narrowly focussed on copyright infringements by online file sharing via peer-to-peer networks and applications. This will be welcomed by many people. However, despite the intentions behind the law, the definitive interpretation will come from decisions made by the Copyright Tribunal and Courts if this aspect of the law is ever tested.”
“Streaming websites and online file lockers typically provide copyright owners with a more direct means of enforcing their rights.

Generally, this is achieved by copyright owners providing a notice directly to the website that infringing content is appearing on the site and needs to be removed. For example, YouTube has tools like Content ID and a Copyright Verification Tool that enable copyright owners to easily identify, control, and even remove their content from the site.”

“This clarification doesn’t mean that copyright infringements by means other than peer-to-peer applications and networks aren’t covered by the Copyright Act. The Internet Service Providers’ liability provisions inserted by the Copyright (New Technologies) Amendment Act 2008 of general infringement (92B), storing infringing material (92C), and caching (92E) still continue. Rights owners can continue to seek enforcement through the Courts. However, they can’t use the new streamlined provisions of sections 122A to 122U for alleged infringements relating to Internet Service Providers’ storage and caching of infringing content.”

“This is a good time to emphasise that peer-to-peer technologies aren’t in themselves bad. Quite the contrary. These technologies provide significant advantages for many legitimate uses, such as eliminating the single point of failure typical of client-server systems and distributing computing resources. For example, peer-to-peer technologies are extensively used by popular services like Facebook, Skype and Twitter as well as for efficient data distribution in scientific research and Linux distributions. So blocking peer-to-peer protocols rather than focussing on copyright infringement in response to the law changes is a bad response.”

Explanatory note

“Streaming” is a technique for transferring data so that it can be processed as a steady and continuous stream. This allows a person to start watching online, say a video or TV show, without waiting to get the whole file. Typically, streaming is used in a one-to-many situation. “Peer-to-peer” on the other hand is a distributed architecture where peers are both consumers and suppliers. People can connect directly with other people and is therefore used in a many-to-many situation.

Examples of peer-to-peer protocols include Gnutella and BitTorrent.

Popular peer-to-peer software includes uTorrent, BitComet, FrostWire, Ares, LimeRunner, and Vuze.

Online file lockers are ways for storing and sharing a wide variety of files online. Examples of online file lockers include MediaFire and 4shared.
 






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  Reply # 496230 21-Jul-2011 13:04
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freitasm: Interesting twist:


Not really a twist - It's been abundantly clear since the very first proposal of S92A that this was the only way it could be done  since the ISPs are not required to snoop on and share customer traffic with rights holders.

It's good to have the clarification though because it will calm some of the people down tho want to get upset about the new law, but refuse to actually read it. :-)

Cheers - N

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