Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




140 posts

Master Geek

Trusted

Topic # 228778 22-Jan-2018 13:39
Send private message

Hey folks. Today I was offered access to a device that allows you to send messages to anyone within Bluetooth range. It looks like quite a sophisticated solution and I asked them whether it was legal to use, because of privacy issues.

 

It sounded really cool, like a billboard on your mobile, but I wanted to check. I went to the DIA website and found the following and I guess I have my answer. I'd welcome any comments. It would seem like a cool opportunity to 'market' to people in a very small proximity, but I can't see it passing the following requirements, even thought the specific technology isn't mentioned and of course new tech comes out all the time. :

 

Anyone sending commercial electronic messages needs to follow the Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007.

 

This law applies to:

 

  • Electronic messages: email, text messages (SMS), instant messages, and facsimile messages (faxes) that are
  • Commercial: promoting a product, service, business or investment opportunity.

This law says that when you send a commercial electronic message:

 

  • The person receiving it must agree to receive your messages.
  • You need to clearly and accurately say who you are as the sender.
  • There must be a clear and easy way for the person receiving your commercial electronic messages to unsubscribe or stop receiving them.

 

 

 





Luigi
Helping companies with location based problem solving, blogs and social media
SolomoConsulting

Find me on LinkedIn
Blog http://luigicappel.wordpress.com
Check out my songwriting

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
2296 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1107


  Reply # 1945031 22-Jan-2018 21:24
2 people support this post
Send private message

Sounds appalling to me.

 

Surely you would need an app on your device to display whatever messages are received viat BlueTooth?

 

 


21012 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4154

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1945033 22-Jan-2018 21:30
Send private message

Already seen similar with pairing requests from spammy things on pre BTLE gear. I think thats a majority about why phones now are only discoverable for a short time after you press that option.





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


Try Wrike: fast, easy, and efficient project collaboration software
2461 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1127


  Reply # 1945042 22-Jan-2018 22:05
4 people support this post
Send private message

Even if it is legal, which it probably isn't, it's a truly appalling idea.

 

I wouldn't describe it as a "a cool opportunity to 'market' to people". More an irritating intrusion, the electronic equivalent of walking up and standing in front of me while shouting and waving your arms to get my attention, that would pretty much guarantee I never did business you you.

 

If it started happening a lot, I would either disable bluetooth all the time or look for another technical solution to block it. As well as ping you to the DIA for breaking the rules around unsolicited electronic messaging.

 

My phone is there for my convenience, and so that people I know and care about to get in touch with me. Not for a bunch of randos to hijack and use to bombard me with unsolicited, and unwanted, marketing spam.


1432 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 313


  Reply # 1945048 22-Jan-2018 22:35
One person supports this post
Send private message

Could be a very useful device in specific situations. It could be used to provide instructions or information electronically in a certain proximity. To even consider delivering unsolicited spam via such a device is despicable.

BDFL - Memuneh
60245 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 11298

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1945049 22-Jan-2018 22:44
One person supports this post
Send private message


140 posts

Master Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 1945114 23-Jan-2018 06:46
Send private message

No you don't need an app F, it uses the Google Nearby API. 

 

Richard, you could be right. Google created Google Nearby for a reason and location based marketing is a big future space.

 

Jimmy I agree and I have contacted the DIA to make them aware of the concept. I haven't named the product because it is an American product and I want confirmation of my belief that it is illegal, plus if Google are promoting the concept of contacting all devices within Bluetooth range, the problem isn't in my mind the developer who is simply taking advantage of a Google API and in some cases there may be good use cases.

 

For example a trade only expo where you could make offers to people as they pass your booth, for example at CES, you might think it was cool. At the bus stop you would not.

 

1eStar, totally agree

 

Mauricio it is a Bluetooth transmitting device that doesn't look dissimilar to a Tile and in this particular usage it comes with a powerful mobile app that allows you to push all sorts of marketing material from web pages to messages and calls to action.

 

Bigger than this app though is that Google is marketing the API and IMHO and I know I've been saying it for years, location is about to go loco.

 

 





Luigi
Helping companies with location based problem solving, blogs and social media
SolomoConsulting

Find me on LinkedIn
Blog http://luigicappel.wordpress.com
Check out my songwriting

gzt

9714 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1445


  Reply # 1945122 23-Jan-2018 07:16
Send private message

PDAMan: No you don't need an app F, it uses the Google Nearby API.

You need an app. The app may already be on your phone, but you do need an app. It's currently an opt in service. You can assume if users are getting Nearby notifications then they have opted in.

Imo there is a bit of confusion between Nearby which is an opt in service and is not spamming..

versus Bluetooth spamming which essentially tries to pair with random devices in an unsolicited way* and uses the device name field to convey an unsolicited message.

Perhaps some Bluetooth spamming companies are attempting to integrate or move to Nearby and causing some confusion?


Edit: *there are similar message vectors potentially available

BDFL - Memuneh
60245 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 11298

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1945281 23-Jan-2018 12:10
Send private message
2906 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 274


  Reply # 1945293 23-Jan-2018 12:40
Send private message

Interesting.

 

A friend of mine came to me about 10 years ago with this exact idea and we started looking at how to go about doing it.

 

His idea was more about doing in store promotions for particular brands or products, as you passed that area in the store, and not about spamming you when you're just outside.

 

He got offered a job in Australia so it never went anywhere.

 

 





523 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 335


  Reply # 1945369 23-Jan-2018 13:26
Send private message

Now that people walk around with their faces buried in a phone and headphone in the ears, oblivious to their surroundings, they don't see signs and hoardings anymore, so I guess this is a modern version of a sign. Beyond the commercial applications, it could be handy as a safety device a locations such as railway crossings and intersections.

 

Link

 

Link

 

 


258 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 49

Trusted
Emergency Management

  Reply # 1945407 23-Jan-2018 14:03
Send private message

Could also be something like this http://www.trackforce.com/software/guardtek-patrol/ or https://www.authenticate.co.nz/security/ 

 

These are starting to be used more by security guards to track buildings and lone working conditions 




140 posts

Master Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 1945594 23-Jan-2018 18:45
Send private message

This is the link https://www.royaltie.com/?af=Leaddevice101

 

This is what they say.

 

"Automatically promote your business on every nearby Android phone."

 

"Restaurants, salons, fitness clubs and boutiques have one thing in common – they want to attract new customers. Imagine how amazing it would be to send a special offer to everyone walking by…straight to their smartphone. Well, imagine no more – amazing is here."





Luigi
Helping companies with location based problem solving, blogs and social media
SolomoConsulting

Find me on LinkedIn
Blog http://luigicappel.wordpress.com
Check out my songwriting

gzt

9714 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1445


  Reply # 1945654 23-Jan-2018 19:17
Send private message

Assumes
1) Chrome is installed
2) Chrome settings > privacy > physical web is enabled
3) Device location services are enabled
4) Bluetooth enabled
5) WiFi enabled

Is that the default on your Android?

I'm not sure about 3,4,5 being all needed and NFC.

Some combination will be a minimum.

BDFL - Memuneh
60245 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 11298

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1945666 23-Jan-2018 19:40
Send private message

It's a beacon. It's an Android and iOS feature. It can be turned off (I have "Physical web" option off on my devices).







140 posts

Master Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 1945705 23-Jan-2018 20:16
Send private message

This product only talks about Android. 

 

2 Questions:

 

1. Does the native default have these on?

 

2. Still seems to me to not be legal if you haven't opted in. What do you think?





Luigi
Helping companies with location based problem solving, blogs and social media
SolomoConsulting

Find me on LinkedIn
Blog http://luigicappel.wordpress.com
Check out my songwriting

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Lightbox updates platform with new streaming options
Posted 17-May-2018 13:09


Norton Core router launches with high-performance, IoT security in New Zealand
Posted 16-May-2018 02:00


D-Link ANZ launches new 4G LTE Dual SIM M2M VPN Router
Posted 15-May-2018 19:30


New Panasonic LUMIX FT7 ideal for outdoor: waterproof, dustproof
Posted 15-May-2018 19:17


Ryanair Goes All-In on AWS
Posted 15-May-2018 19:14


Te Papa and EQC Minecraft Mod shakes up earthquake education
Posted 15-May-2018 19:12


Framing Facebook: It’s not about technology
Posted 14-May-2018 16:02


Vocus works with NZ Police and telcos to stop scam calls
Posted 12-May-2018 11:12


Vista Group signs Aeon Entertainment, largest cinema chain in Japan
Posted 11-May-2018 21:41


New Privacy Trust Mark certifies privacy and customer control
Posted 10-May-2018 14:16


New app FIXR connects vehicle owners to top Mechanics at best prices
Posted 10-May-2018 14:13


Nutanix Beam gives enterprises control of the cloud
Posted 10-May-2018 14:09


D-Link ANZ launches Covr Seamless Wi-Fi System
Posted 10-May-2018 14:06


Telstra, Intel and Ericsson demonstrate a 5G future for esports
Posted 10-May-2018 13:59


Spark introduces Android One with Nokia 7 plus and Nokia 6.1
Posted 8-May-2018 05:00



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.