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  Reply # 689712 21-Sep-2012 21:49
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The LedLux Lucci lights have finally been fitted in my bathroom. What can I say, they're lights, they look good, the light from them looks a little cooler and somehow better than CFL, and they just work. Five of them in a room 4m x 2.5m lights it up like daytime, or at least bright enough that I doubt I'll ever wish for more light.




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  Reply # 692172 27-Sep-2012 12:33
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I saw that there were some LED lamps for sale at the warehouse when I was there.

Only warm white ones, $25ish for 7 watts or so.

http://twitter.yfrog.com/z/ob1fcoej

and only in B22 so no use for 90% of lights out there.




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  Reply # 692189 27-Sep-2012 12:48
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My LEDs are in and working and they look great.
The electricians were also very impressed with the light output from them.




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  Reply # 692192 27-Sep-2012 12:53
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richms: only in B22 so no use for 90% of lights out there.


B22 is the side prongs bayonet fitting right?  That's actually what 90% of houses in NZ would have, especially pre say 1995 ish.

E27 are the fat sized screw fittings of newer lightbulbs, but I'd doubt if they'd be most common?

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  Reply # 692239 27-Sep-2012 13:48
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All my floor lamps with flexible arms, desk lamps, outdoor lamps, bunker lamps and downlights are E27, only B22's are a few battern holders that I put in since the E27 ones are so damn expensive.




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  Reply # 695290 3-Oct-2012 08:06
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If lumens is a measure of area, i.e the full 360degrees, measured in a sphere and all light funnelled into a single point to measure light output in lumens, why is it that this same old measurement is appled to the new LED technology.   This would work ok for Incandescents and CFLS,  but for LED where there is minimal light pollution wasted in a backwards direction, why haven't we created a new lumen standard that accurately shows the brightness for the end user in the room? I have seen a lot of half lumen LED outshine a lot of 75Wbulbs lately because the LED is 180degrees.  But as a consumer, now even lumens doesn't help me, I have to think of LED lumens as double the lumens than on the box, and its probably worse because now it also depends on the amount of backwards light spread from an LED, I don't want to be paying for light pollution into the roof :)

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  Reply # 695341 3-Oct-2012 09:29
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That is why they provide you with radiation patterns and usually a diameter and lux level for certain mounting heights, which is more useful to people that are installing or specifying lighting choices.




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  Reply # 695380 3-Oct-2012 10:41
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It's still a better way to describe the light source than watts, which is a measure of consumption, not output.

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  Reply # 696919 5-Oct-2012 19:26
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On 1 September 2010 the EU mandated LEDs must primarily be labelled in Lumen, not Watt. It is independent of the fixture, for example my 600 Lumen LED with 120 degree viewing angle in a recessed fitting provides the same illumination as a 100W incandescent in the same fitting, but not the same if in a pendant fitting. This is because the recessed fitting wastes a lot to the back of the bulb where the LED does not radiate.

A better measure would be Lux and illumination angle (or radiation pattern), so you know what light intensity you will get and spread over what angle.




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  Reply # 697806 8-Oct-2012 12:19
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Philips Smart Bright LED Downlight 

Anyone tried these? Available in Bunning's and here
http://www.ecolighting.co.nz/view/26/5/philips-smart-bright-led-downlight-105mm/
http://www.ecolighting.co.nz/view/27/5/philips-smartbright-led-downlight-125mm/

590 lum/980 lum for the 105/125 cut out sized options

I wonder if the 590 lum 3*3w is bright enough to replace my existing downlights, save the hassle of a different cut out size.

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  Reply # 697823 8-Oct-2012 12:49
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a 10w neutral white LED lamp is great, so I would expect that 9 in total would be fine. Just watch if they are 3 discrete emitters without a diffuser since the shadows are horrible.




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  Reply # 697836 8-Oct-2012 13:07
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I have five 600 lumen downlights in my 4x2.5m bathroom, it's pretty bright in there - brighter than I'd want in a living area.

What size and shape's the room you're putting them in hangong, and what's the room use?

Insulation cover ratings are pretty important I think, otherwise downlights waste far more heat than you lose in power. The ones I linked to above are IC rated, but they're smaller than you want.




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  Reply # 697844 8-Oct-2012 13:21
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Thanks guys

I'm thinking about the dinning and family area. Exclude void, dinning is approx. 3.3 by 2.4 metres covered by 3 downlights, family is approx. 4.4 by 3.2 metres covered by 4 downlights.

On a second thought, the 3*3w may not provide comfortable reading lights for a bedroom, but should be enough for the living areas.

ps it's the ground level of a 2 lvl house. For upper level I'd look for IC-rated, but I didn't quite like what the sparkies recommended (HD60TC).

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  Reply # 697863 8-Oct-2012 14:07
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I think you're at personal preference level here. I think it'll be bright enough to see easily, without making it a really bright room. I mostly use two 20W CF bulbs in my lounge 4x4 or 5.5m lounge, that's around 2200 lumens i think. My dining area's pretty huge, but above the table we have a single 20W CF bulb which does fine, that's around 1000 lumen I think.

Like I said before, 3000 lumens in a 4x2.5m mostly white bathroom room seems really bright, more than you'd want for general living.




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  Reply # 697886 8-Oct-2012 14:29
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CYaBro: My LEDs are in and working and they look great.
The electricians were also very impressed with the light output from them.


Do LED down lights have to be installed by an electrician if you are just replacing existing down lights?

Lighting Direct page for LUCCI says "Must be installed by licensed electrician"
http://www.lightingdirect.co.nz/ledlux-lucci-11w-down-light-kit-white

Consumer Build seems to say replacing fittings is ok
http://www.consumerbuild.org.nz/publish/diy/diylegal-electrical.php

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