Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

#196519 3-Jun-2016 07:52
Send private message

I have this door latch in some of my old wardrobes. It's really difficult for my wife to open and really loud when it opens or closes - the spring seems really strong, it's not just in need of an oil. I want to replace it with something else - a simple handle and some kind of latch - a small setup, not large door handles like for room doors. Not sure what though.

 

I measured the plate thingy where the little round thing comes out. From memory it was something like 54mm top to bottom, whereas my internal doors have a plate that's something like 58mm high. I figure I go to the hardware store to find something else, but if I need to make that hole in the side of the door bigger how do I do that? Chisel? Some kind of saw? I have a jigsaw is all.

 

Thoughts or suggestions welcome.

 

Click to see full size


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
MikeB4
18201 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified
Trusted
Subscriber

  #1564719 3-Jun-2016 07:58
Send private message

Have you tried a dry lubricant such as silicone or candle wax to allow quieter, easier opening and closing? May well be the quickest and easiest fix.

 
 
 

You will find anything you want at MightyApe (affiliate link).
timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564721 3-Jun-2016 08:05
Send private message

No haven't tried lubricant. It seems to have a really strong spring in there, it's not just sticky. My wife doesn't like it at all, wants it gone, so gone it is.


MikeB4
18201 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified
Trusted
Subscriber

  #1564723 3-Jun-2016 08:09
Send private message

If it's a hollow core door it will be a pain as you don't have much to work with.



timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564729 3-Jun-2016 08:18
Send private message

It's a really old door, but I don't know what type. Guess I'll find out when I remove the latch, which has been painted over probably 5 times.


Mattmannz
471 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1564732 3-Jun-2016 08:23
Send private message

Typically those striker resistance style latches can be adjusted. You unscrew the face plate off the striker and then pull the striker out and you can rotate the spring loaded assembly left or right which winds it in or out and makes it protrude more or less. This obviously changes the amount of resistance required to open or close.


timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564733 3-Jun-2016 08:25
Send private message

Mattmannz:

 

Typically those striker resistance style latches can be adjusted. You unscrew the face plate off the striker and then pull the striker out and you can rotate the spring loaded assembly left or right which winds it in or out and makes it protrude more or less. This obviously changes the amount of resistance required to open or close.

 

 

That's interesting, I'll definitely try that before replacing it, thanks :)


mdf

mdf
3343 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1564763 3-Jun-2016 09:17
Send private message

What @mattmannz said. Even if the one you've got isn't adjustable (the spring might just be old and creaky), you can probably get a like-for-like replacement (with the tension turned down) installed quite easily. There are both plastic and metal versions of this type of latch and while the plastic ones do look a bit cheap, they are quieter.

 

If you're replacing with a completely different style of latch, the size of the face plate isn't particularly indicative of the size of the mechanism behind it. I would guess though that for that style of latch it will be quite a small shaft, and you'd have to chisel or route out the space to install a bigger locking mechanism. Modern locks usually come with a little template for drilling out the necessary bits and pieces, but it's nigh on impossible to drill an existing hole out into a bigger hole without some pretty specialist kit.

 

If it's a hollow core door (so harder to install "proper" locks) it will pretty lightweight, so you could even take the latch out entirely and replace it with a cupboard-style magnetic latch in the top corner. Fill up the latch hole with expanding foam or off cuts, then smooth the face with builders bog, sand and paint. If you _really_ wanted to get fancy, replace the handles with some nice metal handles and it will be like a new door.




timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564765 3-Jun-2016 09:20
Send private message

Magnetic latches sound like the best idea if the current latch isn't easily adjustable. My wife would prefer close to zero noise / effort to open. I have expanding foam and three kinds of builders bog and plenty of experience using both, I'm going to be spending the weekend filling and painting window sills after having double glazing installed this week.


linw
2718 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1564774 3-Jun-2016 09:24
Send private message

I've got a similar one and, much to my surprise, it was adjustable. Just looked at the blown up version of your pic and I wouldn't be surprised if it is the same as mine.

 

Mine is a Samson and beneath the protruding bit are instructions for altering the pressure. Yours is painted over!

 

It says to use a coin to twist the sticky out bit. 

 

Pretty confident you'll get a solution as I did.


MikeB4
18201 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified
Trusted
Subscriber

  #1564785 3-Jun-2016 09:39
Send private message

timmmay:

 

Magnetic latches sound like the best idea if the current latch isn't easily adjustable. My wife would prefer close to zero noise / effort to open. I have expanding foam and three kinds of builders bog and plenty of experience using both, I'm going to be spending the weekend filling and painting window sills after having double glazing installed this week.

 

 

 

 

Magnetic latches in my experience are horrible, their life expectancy is very short. We were constantly replacing them. Which reminds me our pantry needs a replacement for a magnetic latch dammit.


timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564807 3-Jun-2016 09:45
Send private message

linw:

 

I've got a similar one and, much to my surprise, it was adjustable. Just looked at the blown up version of your pic and I wouldn't be surprised if it is the same as mine.

 

Mine is a Samson and beneath the protruding bit are instructions for altering the pressure. Yours is painted over!

 

It says to use a coin to twist the sticky out bit. 

 

Pretty confident you'll get a solution as I did.

 

 

So do I unscrew the two main screws, look under the plate, and adjust there?

 

 


timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564808 3-Jun-2016 09:45
Send private message

MikeB4:

 

 

 

Magnetic latches in my experience are horrible, their life expectancy is very short. We were constantly replacing them. Which reminds me our pantry needs a replacement for a magnetic latch dammit.

 

 

Advantage would be that sticky out ball bit wouldn't keep carving a mark in the wood between the cupboards. Whoever put this in wasn't very smart.


robcreid
243 posts

Master Geek


  #1564826 3-Jun-2016 09:53
Send private message

timmmay:

 

 

 

Advantage would be that sticky out ball bit wouldn't keep carving a mark in the wood between the cupboards. Whoever put this in wasn't very smart.

 

 

I think latches like this should normally have a strike plate on the opposing surface. It should stick out a couple of mm and be angled so the latch gets pushed in gradually as the door closes.  


timmmay

19720 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1564828 3-Jun-2016 09:55
Send private message

robcreid:

 

 

 

I think latches like this should normally have a strike plate on the opposing surface. It should stick out a couple of mm and be angled so the latch gets pushed in gradually as the door closes.  

 

 

Good point. I'll have a look in the shed to see if I have any, otherwise I might go get a couple, if they sell them separately.


PeterQ
84 posts

Master Geek


  #1564894 3-Jun-2016 10:53
Send private message

Just get a flat screw driver and push the latch in while turning to the right, it might need a couple of turns to get it to what you want


 1 | 2
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic





News and reviews »

InternetNZ Releases Internet Insights 2023
Posted 20-Feb-2024 10:31


Seagate Adds 24TB IronWolf Pro Hard Drives for Multi-user Commercial and Enterprise RAID Storage Solutions
Posted 19-Feb-2024 16:54


Seagate Skyhawk AI 24TB Elevates Edge Security Capacity and Performance
Posted 9-Feb-2024 17:18


GoPro Releases Quik Desktop App for macOS and Introduces Premium+ Subscription Tier
Posted 9-Feb-2024 17:14


Ring Introduces New Ring Battery Video Doorbell Pro
Posted 9-Feb-2024 16:51


Galaxy AI Transforms the new Galaxy S24 Series
Posted 18-Jan-2024 07:00


D-Link launches AI-Powered Aquila Pro M30 Wi-Fi 6 Mesh Systems
Posted 17-Jan-2024 20:02


Newest LG 4K Lifestyle Projector Doubles as Art Objet
Posted 9-Jan-2024 15:50


More LG Smart TV Owners Set To Enjoy the Latest webOS Upgrade
Posted 9-Jan-2024 15:45


Panasonic Announces the Z95A and Z93A With Fire TV Built In
Posted 9-Jan-2024 15:30


Amazon Echo Pop Review
Posted 8-Jan-2024 14:22


Samsung Tab S9 FE Review
Posted 17-Dec-2023 08:26


Year in Search: What Kiwis Searched for in 2023
Posted 12-Dec-2023 08:18


New Air Traffic Management Platform and Resilient Buildings a Milestone for Airways
Posted 6-Dec-2023 05:00


Logitech G Launches New Flagship Console Wireless Gaming Headset Astro A50 X
Posted 5-Dec-2023 21:00









Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.







Backblaze unlimited backup