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Topic # 248923 16-Apr-2019 12:17
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This plug is in the cupboard under our kitchen sink. Anybody know what it is?

 

 

We have another one in the lounge.

 

Its an old house. Late 70's.

 

Cheers


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Stu

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  Reply # 2218081 16-Apr-2019 12:22
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Doesn't look like a socket, from the photo as I see it on my phone. Looks more like a plate where you'd have a cable hard-wired to the switch, passing through the plate directly to the appliance. Often seen on older heaters, extractor fans, and the like. Perhaps an old waste disposal unit under the sink? Still seen on heated towel rails etc.




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  Reply # 2218084 16-Apr-2019 12:23
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It's probably just a powerpoint, which has had its directly-wired appliance removed (The one in the lounge might have been from a nightstore or similar heater.)

 

The connection inside the powerpoint may or not be live, and may be on a nightrate/second meter. It was probably just deemed too much hassle to remove the powerpoint when the appliance was removed, so the cut off the wire and left it.


 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 2218085 16-Apr-2019 12:24
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Thanks.

 

I'm hoping I can replace it with a 240V plug socket.


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  Reply # 2218086 16-Apr-2019 12:32
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BoerieGalore:

 

Thanks.

 

I'm hoping I can replace it with a 240V plug socket.

 

 

 

 

That will be fine, but as mentioned above, find out which circuit it is on, it might be rippled or switched,

 

(not very helpful if you want to use it all the /anytime)




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  Reply # 2218089 16-Apr-2019 12:35
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Thanks for the quick response guys.


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  Reply # 2218096 16-Apr-2019 12:45
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Stu:
Doesn't look like a socket, from the photo as I see it on my phone. Looks more like a plate where you'd have a cable hard-wired to the switch, passing through the plate directly to the appliance. Often seen on older heaters, extractor fans, and the like. Perhaps am old waste disposal unit under the sink? Still seen on heated towel rails etc.

 

They used to be called "Permanent Connection Unit" (PCU) back in the day, they were used because in those days the homeowner wasn't allowed to futz with permanently connected appliances, it was a sparky-only job.

 

So if your appliance was attached to one of these, you had to call a sparky to do anything. And if you had a controlled storage heater, you couldn't plug it into a regular uncontrolled outlet, because that would be against the rules.
So of course that never happened. Cough.

 

 




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  Reply # 2218106 16-Apr-2019 12:53
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PolicyGuy:

 

Stu:
Doesn't look like a socket, from the photo as I see it on my phone. Looks more like a plate where you'd have a cable hard-wired to the switch, passing through the plate directly to the appliance. Often seen on older heaters, extractor fans, and the like. Perhaps am old waste disposal unit under the sink? Still seen on heated towel rails etc.

 

They used to be called "Permanent Connection Unit" (PCU) back in the day, they were used because in those days the homeowner wasn't allowed to futz with permanently connected appliances, it was a sparky-only job.

 

So if your appliance was attached to one of these, you had to call a sparky to do anything. And if you had a controlled storage heater, you couldn't plug it into a regular uncontrolled outlet, because that would be against the rules.
So of course that never happened. Cough.

 

 

 

 

That makes a lot of sense now thank you. And I think you guys are right about it being on uncontrolled power. I have seen the same plug at the hot water cylinder (which I assume is wired to the controlled power meter).

 

I'm with Electric Kiwi power and pay a flat rate for electricity anyway, regardless of how much of my electricity is controlled.


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  Reply # 2218141 16-Apr-2019 13:19
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Hopefully you replace it with a 230V socket, no 240V here.

 

Cyril




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  Reply # 2218150 16-Apr-2019 13:32
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I was actually looking at one of these: (250V rated). Not sure I would something that is only rated 230V

 

https://www.electricaldirectltd.co.nz/product/1552-Clipsal-Classic-C2000-Single-Horizontal-Switched-Power-Outlet-250V-10A


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  Reply # 2218287 16-Apr-2019 16:16
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Rating or connecting, typically these type of electrical fittings are rated to 250V as they are derived from international vendors, however in NZ finding 240 or 250V is not common.

 

Cyril


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  Reply # 2219339 16-Apr-2019 18:00
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Be aware that it may be controlled by a ripple relay which may switch it off at peak load times. It does not matter that you pay a flat rate for your power, the hot water is still quite possibly controlled.

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  Reply # 2219421 16-Apr-2019 20:12
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Still called a permanent connection unit or simply PCU.

gzt

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  Reply # 2219428 16-Apr-2019 20:18
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You need to find out what circuit this is on. For instance this node could be relatively unprotected.

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  Reply # 2219443 16-Apr-2019 21:06
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cyril7:

 

Rating or connecting, typically these type of electrical fittings are rated to 250V as they are derived from international vendors, however in NZ finding 240 or 250V is not common.

 

Cyril

 

 

240 is common, the legally allowable range is 216.2-243.8 (230 +/- 6%). The distributor will generally tap the transformer up so the properties nearest are near the upper limit, and the jug will still boil in a decent amount of time for those furthest away.


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  Reply # 2219520 17-Apr-2019 06:16
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larknz: Be aware that it may be controlled by a ripple relay which may switch it off at peak load times. It does not matter that you pay a flat rate for your power, the hot water is still quite possibly controlled.

 

 

 

Just bumping this above comment to the OP... as they already made a comment that suggests that they do not know what 'ripple control' is and thinks it has to do with billing. 

 

 

 

 


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