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Topic # 123325 3-Jul-2013 13:53
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I am looking to install a distributed video solution as part of my home automation when I build my house this year.

I am trying to find some software that will rip DVD/Bluray Movies and TV shows to the HDD is a compressed (nearly lossless) format such as MKV.

NOTE: This is for all my LEGALLY owned PHYSICAL media. I have 2 kids under two and they a wife that isn't careful with Disks so a digital option is much better.

They problem I find is that most software cant do it all, is slow, has a bad interface or is just really hard to use.


any advice would be greatly appreciated.


Also if anyone knows of a hardware solution (some kind of box you can buy) that would do this. please let me know.

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  Reply # 848768 3-Jul-2013 14:04
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I've seen MakeMKV recommended a few times, although I have no experience with it myself.

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  Reply # 848774 3-Jul-2013 14:19
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Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!


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  Reply # 848785 3-Jul-2013 14:40
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sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!



Interesting.

/off topic
Are Tivo users then breaking the law in NZ? (format shifting/ Home Networking Package)

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  Reply # 848790 3-Jul-2013 14:46
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sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!



So can he just copy to another DVD? Not that I care about stupid laws.

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  Reply # 848793 3-Jul-2013 14:55
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Will Handbrake do it? I know it will do it from Video_TS folders.

You will need something to strip the copy protection - I think AnyDVD is still the best.

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  Reply # 848795 3-Jul-2013 14:57
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Klipspringer:
sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!



Interesting.

/off topic
Are Tivo users then breaking the law in NZ? (format shifting/ Home Networking Package)


technically no, because they can claim to be doing so under the "time shifting" exemption, 

Basically format shifitng/recording is illegal under NZ copyright, 

There are specific exemption for "time shifting"  and for audio format shifting, 

But in reality, no one is going to bust down you door for storing your films on a network drive) 

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  Reply # 848796 3-Jul-2013 15:01
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wellygary: 

But in reality, no one is going to bust down you door for storing your films on a network drive) 


Unless you Kim Dotcom LOL

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  Reply # 848797 3-Jul-2013 15:04
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trig42: Will Handbrake do it? I know it will do it from Video_TS folders.

You will need something to strip the copy protection - I think AnyDVD is still the best.


Handbrake will not do BluRay, and by itself will not do commercial DVDs as a stand alone (They removed libdvdcss) - although this can be re-enabled by installing VLC.

I use a combination of MakeMVK, Handbrake and Ripit  on OSX to maintain my MP4 library, 

to the OP be warned you are gonna get some whoppingly large files with Blueray MVKs ( 20-30 GB easy)



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  Reply # 848804 3-Jul-2013 15:21
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sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!



What about recontainering? a .mt2s file can be renammed to a .mkv with no editing

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  Reply # 848816 3-Jul-2013 15:25
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I use ripit on my Mac.

Works a treat, but only for DVD's. No Bluray support.




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  Reply # 848836 3-Jul-2013 15:57
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kiwitrc:
sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!



So can he just copy to another DVD? Not that I care about stupid laws.


I really find this kind of attitude quite strange. So you consider yourself exempt from rules you don't agree with? 

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  Reply # 848840 3-Jul-2013 16:06
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DVDFab is pretty good.

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  Reply # 848897 3-Jul-2013 18:51
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sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law!



http://www.med.govt.nz/business/intellectual-property/copyright/copyright-new-technologies-amendment-act/faqs/format-shifting/does-the-act-specify-any-special-conditions-that-must-be-adhered-to-when-format-shifting

The above seems to say it's legal for music.
Wouldn't a hard argument to have it apply to video as well.

Plus digital to digital right what "format" is changing?




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  Reply # 848932 3-Jul-2013 20:15
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mentalinc: Wouldn't a hard argument to have it apply to video as well.


Actually, it would be a hard argument to make in in a court of law. When the exemption for audio format shifting was being considered by parliament, doing the same for video was also considered. This was rejected and only audio was exempted.

So this isn't an unintentional anomaly. The disparity between audio and video format shifting is the explicit intent of parliament.

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  Reply # 848963 3-Jul-2013 21:51
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NZVengeance: NOTE: This is for all my LEGALLY owned PHYSICAL media. I have 2 kids under two and they a wife that isn't careful with Disks so a digital option is much better.


It doesn't matter, still not legal in New Zealand to format shift video, only audio CDs.
 
mentalinc:
sbiddle: Whatever you use remember format shifting isn't legal in NZ so you're actually breaking the law! 



http://www.med.govt.nz/business/intellectual-property/copyright/copyright-new-technologies-amendment-act/faqs/format-shifting/does-the-act-specify-any-special-conditions-that-must-be-adhered-to-when-format-shifting

The above seems to say it's legal for music.

Wouldn't a hard argument to have it apply to video as well.


From the same site FAQ:


Why is there a format shifting provision and why is it limited to sound recordings?

The new format shifting provision responds to the concern that people want to transfer music they have legitimately bought onto different devices to take advantage of new technology.  It also recognises this has been common practice for a long time.

The markets for audio visual works and music are evolving, they are different.  There are numerous business models for audiovisual works that do not apply to music.  Theatrical release, commercial rental (both physical and online models), free-to-air TV and pay TV do not have counterparts of any significant extent for music.  It is also unlikely that consumption of audio visual works "on the move" using mp3 players and the like will ever be as ubiquitous as for music.  It is not, therefore, possible to simply apply the conclusions reached about music to audio visual works.


The TiVo is not format shift, but time shift.








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