Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




312 posts

Ultimate Geek


#153608 2-Oct-2014 18:05
Send private message

Hello All

After 7 hours the Chorus tech's left my house after installing fibre. I'm on the 100/20 plan. When they left I was only getting 20/1.9Mbps. A call to Vodafone fixed that after he remotely had to change some settings which were incorrectly configured on my Brand new modem. So after that being fixed my speeds went up to 89/20 with a ping of 16. Not bad, but not quite what I'm paying for. Its the ping that annoys me because I know it meant to be lower. The Vodafone rep said he will call me tomorrow after doing some research and he encouraged me to post here.

Do fibre speeds need time to settle? Is my speed acceptable? The Vodafone rep thinks it should be better.

All test done on my laptop with windows 8.1 over Ethernet directly into modem. 

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
5835 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  #1145837 2-Oct-2014 18:05
Send private message

Hello... Our robot found some keywords in your post, so here is an automated reply with some important things to note regarding broadband speeds.

 



 

If you are posting regarding DSL speeds please check that

 



 

- you have reset your modem and router

 


 

- your PC (or other PCs in your LAN) is not downloading large files when you are testing

 

- you are not being throttled by your ISP due to going over the monthly cap

 


 

- your tests are always done on an ethernet connection to the router - do not use wireless for testing

 


 

- you read this topic and follow the instructions there.

 



 

Make sure you provide information for other users to help you. If you have not already done it, please EDIT your post and add this now:

 



 

- Your ISP and plan

 


 

- Type of connection (ADSL, ADSL2, VDSL)

 


 

- Your modem DSL stats (do not worry about posting Speedtest, we need sync rate, attenuation and noise margin)

 


 

- Your general location (or street)

 


 

- If you are rural or urban

 


 

- If you know your connection is to an exchange, cabinet or conklin

 


 

- If your connection is to a ULL or wholesale service

 


 

- If you have done an isolation test as per the link above

 



 

Most of the problems with speed are likely to be related to internal wiring issues. Read this discussion to find out more about this. Your ISP is not intentionally slowing you down today (unless you are on a managed plan). Also if this is the school holidays it's likely you will notice slower than usual speed due to more users online.

 



 

A master splitter is required for VDSL2 and in most cases will improve speeds on DSL connections. Regular disconnections can be a monitored alarm or a set top box trying to connect. If there's an alarm connected to your line even if you don't have an alarm contract it may still try to connect so it's worth checking.

 



 

I recommend you read these two blog posts:

 



 

- Is your premises phone wiring impacting your broadband performance? (very technical)

 


 

- Are you receiving a substandard ULL ADSL2+ connection from your ISP?




I am the Geekzone Robot and I am here to help. I am from the Internet. I do not interact. Do not expect other replies from me.



'That VDSL Cat'
12461 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Spark
Subscriber

  #1145859 2-Oct-2014 18:25
Send private message

89/20 sounds much like 100/20 instead of 200/20..

ping to where from where? are you connected to your closest POP? if so is this in your city?

fair few questions are arising, which make it hard to make a definite comment..


Good to see your testing other Ethernet, thats stage one ticked off!

check your Ethernet card is running at gbit and not 100mbit?




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


 
 
 
 


29124 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #1145863 2-Oct-2014 18:30
Send private message

UFB headline speeds are layer 2, not layer 3. Layer 3 overhead means you can only get around 93Mbps on a 100Mbps Ethernet connection. Add in some additional overhead such as PPPoE (assuming VF are using that on UFB, I'm not sure) and the 90Mbps figure is about dead on. For all intent purposes there is absolutely nothing wrong. Some new UFB plans are being dimensioned to give headline speeds at layer3.

You also need to remember that 100Mbps is an EIR (a best effort speed). There is absolutely no guarantee you will get your speed (or close to it) at any time, and you should not expect to get 90Mbps 24/7. The only speed guaranteed on UFB is your 2.5Mbps high priority CIR.

If your laptop and/or router have Gigabit ports? If it has only 10/100 ports then once again there is nothing wrong.








4185 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1145940 2-Oct-2014 19:33
Send private message

sbiddle: UFB headline speeds are layer 2, not layer 3. Layer 3 overhead means you can only get around 93Mbps on a 100Mbps Ethernet connection. Add in some additional overhead such as PPPoE (assuming VF are using that on UFB, I'm not sure) and the 90Mbps figure is about dead on. For all intent purposes there is absolutely nothing wrong. Some new UFB plans are being dimensioned to give headline speeds at layer3.

You also need to remember that 100Mbps is an EIR (a best effort speed). There is absolutely no guarantee you will get your speed (or close to it) at any time, and you should not expect to get 90Mbps 24/7. The only speed guaranteed on UFB is your 2.5Mbps high priority CIR.


It's all fine and well for those who understand these things, but the reality is punters don't. They expect their "100Mbps" line is going to run at 100Mbps 24/7, and if it doesn't they feel that their is a fault or they are being ripped off.




29124 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #1145954 2-Oct-2014 19:47
Send private message

Lias:
sbiddle: UFB headline speeds are layer 2, not layer 3. Layer 3 overhead means you can only get around 93Mbps on a 100Mbps Ethernet connection. Add in some additional overhead such as PPPoE (assuming VF are using that on UFB, I'm not sure) and the 90Mbps figure is about dead on. For all intent purposes there is absolutely nothing wrong. Some new UFB plans are being dimensioned to give headline speeds at layer3.

You also need to remember that 100Mbps is an EIR (a best effort speed). There is absolutely no guarantee you will get your speed (or close to it) at any time, and you should not expect to get 90Mbps 24/7. The only speed guaranteed on UFB is your 2.5Mbps high priority CIR.


It's all fine and well for those who understand these things, but the reality is punters don't. They expect their "100Mbps" line is going to run at 100Mbps 24/7, and if it doesn't they feel that their is a fault or they are being ripped off.


Unfortunately I didn't write the Ethernet standard so there isn't much I can do about this.

As for expectations that you'll get 100Mbps 24/7 on your 100Mbps connection, who sets that expectation? Since it's not the ISP it can really only be the individual.

Do you expect to travel at 100 km/h all the way to work because the speed limit is 100 km/h? How does this differ to the internet?




 

 


414 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1145998 2-Oct-2014 20:11
Send private message

sbiddle:

 

Lias:
sbiddle: UFB headline speeds are layer 2, not layer 3. Layer 3 overhead means you can only get around 93Mbps on a 100Mbps Ethernet connection. Add in some additional overhead such as PPPoE (assuming VF are using that on UFB, I'm not sure) and the 90Mbps figure is about dead on. For all intent purposes there is absolutely nothing wrong. Some new UFB plans are being dimensioned to give headline speeds at layer3.

You also need to remember that 100Mbps is an EIR (a best effort speed). There is absolutely no guarantee you will get your speed (or close to it) at any time, and you should not expect to get 90Mbps 24/7. The only speed guaranteed on UFB is your 2.5Mbps high priority CIR.


It's all fine and well for those who understand these things, but the reality is punters don't. They expect their "100Mbps" line is going to run at 100Mbps 24/7, and if it doesn't they feel that their is a fault or they are being ripped off.


Unfortunately I didn't write the Ethernet standard so there isn't much I can do about this.

As for expectations that you'll get 100Mbps 24/7 on your 100Mbps connection, who sets that expectation? Since it's not the ISP it can really only be the individual.

Do you expect to travel at 100 km/h all the way to work because the speed limit is 100 km/h? How does this differ to the internet?




 

 

 


In reality do I get a constant 100Mbps when transferring from on computer to another on my local network.....





 The views expressed by me are not necessarily those of my employer


'That VDSL Cat'
12461 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Spark
Subscriber

  #1146006 2-Oct-2014 20:21
Send private message

cant wait for gbit connections to be more of a thing.

the why is my gbit connection not getting full speed questions will be even more of an extreme.



and 10Gbit.... finding real local 10Gbit servers to even test against can be a struggle, nevermind getting the tests.




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


 
 
 
 


2092 posts

Uber Geek


  #1146028 2-Oct-2014 20:43
Send private message

Interesting, didn't realise total overhead would be ~10Mb, but expected.

The whole EIR/CIR thing is stated in the contracts I've seen, but Joe user doesn't read that. Having said that, I doubt Joe Average knows/understands the difference between Mbps and MBps and has to be sold their internet in number of facebooks per hour.

So I guess it's good to know.



4185 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1146199 3-Oct-2014 05:17
Send private message

sbiddle:

 

Unfortunately I didn't write the Ethernet standard so there isn't much I can do about this.

As for expectations that you'll get 100Mbps 24/7 on your 100Mbps connection, who sets that expectation? Since it's not the ISP it can really only be the individual.

Do you expect to travel at 100 km/h all the way to work because the speed limit is 100 km/h? How does this differ to the internet?

 



Most of them don't even know what Ethernet is, let alone understand OSI Layers, encapsulation, overhead, etc etc.

Some ISP's advertise "up to xx speeds" but others only mention that in the small print or the T&C's (which as we all know, pretty much no-one ever reads). Even the ones that do say "up to" people don't understand the technology and assume that if like DSL if they are not getting "full speed" there is an issue, or "my isp is crap" (how many times have we seen or heard of that, when its usually not an ISP issue)

Don't get me wrong, I don't think it's necessarily realistic for punters to expect it, I'm just saying many do.






29124 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #1146226 3-Oct-2014 07:16
Send private message

Lias:
sbiddle: Unfortunately I didn't write the Ethernet standard so there isn't much I can do about this.

As for expectations that you'll get 100Mbps 24/7 on your 100Mbps connection, who sets that expectation? Since it's not the ISP it can really only be the individual.

Do you expect to travel at 100 km/h all the way to work because the speed limit is 100 km/h? How does this differ to the internet?


Most of them don't even know what Ethernet is, let alone understand OSI Layers, encapsulation, overhead, etc etc.

Some ISP's advertise "up to xx speeds" but others only mention that in the small print or the T&C's (which as we all know, pretty much no-one ever reads). Even the ones that do say "up to" people don't understand the technology and assume that if like DSL if they are not getting "full speed" there is an issue, or "my isp is crap" (how many times have we seen or heard of that, when its usually not an ISP issue)

Don't get me wrong, I don't think it's necessarily realistic for punters to expect it, I'm just saying many do.




The Vodafone Station only has 10/100 ports, so getting 100Mbps isn't actually possible.

I know people don't understand technology - they're the people who post here refusing to believe their internal wiring or wireless can be causing their speed issues, but the simple reality is you really do need to understand some basics these days to understand why things work.




2258 posts

Uber Geek


  #1146284 3-Oct-2014 09:06
Send private message

sbiddle: ...

The Vodafone Station only has 10/100 ports, so getting 100Mbps isn't actually possible.

...




Not totally relevant for the topic, but I'm pretty sure that the standard router Vodafone supply for fibre installations is the HG659, which has 4 x 1Gbit  ethernet ports.




The three hardest things to say: 1. I was wrong, 2. I need help, 3. Worcestershire sauce.

 

 


'That VDSL Cat'
12461 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Spark
Subscriber

  #1146836 3-Oct-2014 17:43
Send private message

floydbloke:
sbiddle: ...

The Vodafone Station only has 10/100 ports, so getting 100Mbps isn't actually possible.

...




Not totally relevant for the topic, but I'm pretty sure that the standard router Vodafone supply for fibre installations is the HG659, which has 4 x 1Gbit  ethernet ports.


Guess this brings the  question, which router does the OP have.




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


534 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1146858 3-Oct-2014 18:25
Send private message

hio77:
floydbloke:
sbiddle: ...

The Vodafone Station only has 10/100 ports, so getting 100Mbps isn't actually possible.

...




Not totally relevant for the topic, but I'm pretty sure that the standard router Vodafone supply for fibre installations is the HG659, which has 4 x 1Gbit  ethernet ports.


Guess this brings the  question, which router does the OP have.


Most likely the HG659 as that is what Vodafone gives out for their UFB customers, and I doubt that the OP is using a different router while having issues or voda wouldn't be helping him.




Home ADSL:                                                             School: 
 


706 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1146962 3-Oct-2014 21:27
Send private message

If the max speed you are likely to get on a 100/20 plan is about 90/20, what would the max speeds for a 30/20 plan be?

2416 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1146967 3-Oct-2014 21:36
Send private message

sbiddle:
Lias:
sbiddle: UFB headline speeds are layer 2, not layer 3. Layer 3 overhead means you can only get around 93Mbps on a 100Mbps Ethernet connection. Add in some additional overhead such as PPPoE (assuming VF are using that on UFB, I'm not sure) and the 90Mbps figure is about dead on. For all intent purposes there is absolutely nothing wrong. Some new UFB plans are being dimensioned to give headline speeds at layer3.

You also need to remember that 100Mbps is an EIR (a best effort speed). There is absolutely no guarantee you will get your speed (or close to it) at any time, and you should not expect to get 90Mbps 24/7. The only speed guaranteed on UFB is your 2.5Mbps high priority CIR.


It's all fine and well for those who understand these things, but the reality is punters don't. They expect their "100Mbps" line is going to run at 100Mbps 24/7, and if it doesn't they feel that their is a fault or they are being ripped off.


Unfortunately I didn't write the Ethernet standard so there isn't much I can do about this.

As for expectations that you'll get 100Mbps 24/7 on your 100Mbps connection, who sets that expectation? Since it's not the ISP it can really only be the individual.

Do you expect to travel at 100 km/h all the way to work because the speed limit is 100 km/h? How does this differ to the internet?
 


That's the old plans. The new UFB plans are 'right performing' and are over provisioned to allow for these overheads. Each LFC has a slightly different implementation in terms of how much they have over provisioned, and how large their buffers are etc, however I can confirm that being on one of these 'right performing' plans that I can in fact get slightly more than 100mbps/50 on my 100/50 BigPipe plan.

 

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51


QNAP integrates Catalyst Cloud Object Storage into Hybrid Backup solution
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:40



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.