Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


6 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 199064 3-Aug-2016 12:58
Send private message

Hi,

 

 

 

I applied for UFB 1st week of june 2016. Im renting the house  shared driveway but the house in front of me is same owner of my renting house. so i asked my landlord about signing the  consent.

 

But the problem is my landlord wont sign the consent. He is asking me to ask chorus to provide the design plan. 

 

Correct me if im wrong the first step is gain consent from the shared driveway. After getting the consent chorus can now access the property for design plan? My Question is is that possible to ask chorus to provide the design plan with out the shared driveway consent? 

 

 

 

Thanks


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
27125 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6566

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1603519 3-Aug-2016 13:11
Send private message

Design plan typically won't be done until consent has been gained - this allows them to start the design process.

 

 


462 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 249


  Reply # 1603525 3-Aug-2016 13:14
One person supports this post
Send private message

Tell your landlord that the initial consent IS the consent to start the design process. Once a solution has been proposed, he still has the right to review it and reject it.

 

Chorus isn't going to waste their time designing an installation when they haven't got even basic authority from the property owner.




6 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1603526 3-Aug-2016 13:15
Send private message

sbiddle:

 

Design plan typically won't be done until consent has been gained - this allows them to start the design process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I already told that to my landlord. No consent no design process. 

 

I dont know what to do now. :(


895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 285


  Reply # 1603531 3-Aug-2016 13:18
8 people support this post
Send private message

 Stick with VDSL?  Move?  Tell your landlord they're being a dick?  Tell your landlord that people on the internet think they're a dick?




6 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1603535 3-Aug-2016 13:20
Send private message

deadlyllama:

 

 Stick with VDSL?  Move?  Tell your landlord they're being a dick?  Tell your landlord that people on the internet think they're a dick?

 

 

 

 

VDSL is very bad in my area. just getting 11mbps in vdsl line. too far from the cabinet. So UFB is the only option. 

 

 

 

 




6 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1603537 3-Aug-2016 13:21
Send private message

My landlord is asking full written scope of what chorus  are doing in the property. its that the design plan right?


27125 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6566

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1603542 3-Aug-2016 13:27
Send private message

ulltraboost:

 

My landlord is asking full written scope of what chorus  are doing in the property. its that the design plan right?

 

 

Yes


21531 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4384

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1603560 3-Aug-2016 13:47
Send private message

ulltraboost:

 

I already told that to my landlord. No consent no design process. 

 

I dont know what to do now. :(

 

 

Well with the property market as it is he would probably welcome you moving out so that he could up the rent for the new people to move in, so threatning to leave isnt the stick that it once was.

 

 





Richard rich.ms

8 posts

Wannabe Geek
+1 received by user: 2

Trusted
MyRepublic

  Reply # 1603623 3-Aug-2016 14:47
Send private message

Remind your landlord its a free install today - he will probably have to pay for it early next year.

 

That might change his mind





Eoghan

 


127 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 40


  Reply # 1603631 3-Aug-2016 15:08
Send private message

allio:

 

Tell your landlord that the initial consent IS the consent to start the design process. Once a solution has been proposed, he still has the right to review it and reject it.

 

Chorus isn't going to waste their time designing an installation when they haven't got even basic authority from the property owner.

 

 

Does he though? 

 

https://www.chorus.co.nz/broadband-options-for-home-fibre-consent-access/shared-driveway

 

Through the consent process you and your neighbours are agreeing to:

 

  • Chorus accessing the property so we can determine what work needs to be completed to build and install fibre 
  • Installation of Chorus’ new fibre network infrastructure 
  • Ongoing access to the property for the purposes of connecting other properties, maintenance, replacement or to upgrade

 

 

Nothing there about reviewing and the right to reject the plan. 

 

 

 

 


8 posts

Wannabe Geek
+1 received by user: 2

Trusted
MyRepublic

  Reply # 1603660 3-Aug-2016 15:37
Send private message

Advise your landlord to be part of the installation order - that way he can be officially part of the scope process which occurs after consent is given.

 

At this stage he can still say no if he is being pedantic about the roses or whatever





Eoghan

 


14400 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1882


  Reply # 1603679 3-Aug-2016 16:03
Send private message

Generally landlords are looking after number 1, so they don't want to do anything that could affect their house value. But if they know that it may cost them in the future, if they don't do anything, then they may change their mind. Problem is some people just don't understand technology, and many landlords are from the older generation, as due to low bank returns, they have move their money into rentals where the returns are better.  I wonder what a fibre install will cost once it stops being free.


5207 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2119


  Reply # 1603682 3-Aug-2016 16:05
Send private message

What use is consent if it is not informed?

 

If Chorus wanted to install UFB across our section, we would be reticent to give them permission until we knew enough about how they planned to do it to assess any potentially adverse effects or risk of liability.

 

Trenching the cable in beside the fence would be no problem.

 

We wouldn't agree to have fibre fixed to our fence, because it breaches the covenants for our section and looks bad.

 

 





Mike

14400 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1882


  Reply # 1603691 3-Aug-2016 16:13
Send private message

MikeAqua:

 

What use is consent if it is not informed?

 

If Chorus wanted to install UFB across our section, we would be reticent to give them permission until we knew enough about how they planned to do it to assess any potentially adverse effects or risk of liability.

 

Trenching the cable in beside the fence would be no problem.

 

We wouldn't agree to have fibre fixed to our fence, because it breaches the covenants for our section and looks bad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

That is interesting about covenants. I guess you would have to pay extra to have it done another way, as you had agreed to the covenants when you purchased it. It is one of the downsides of buying a property with covenants on it I have found, as it often ends up costing the homeowner more to comply with them. I don't think it would be reasonable for chorus to cover the extra costs of your covenants, as their install methods would comply with a house that didn't have covenants, and would be standard acceptable practice.  It is simialr to having power installed, some covenants require it to be installed underground, yet the cheapest way maybe to just have it overhead from the power pole. SO the homeowner pays more to get it put underground.


5207 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2119


  Reply # 1603709 3-Aug-2016 16:39
Send private message

mattwnz:

 

MikeAqua:

 

If Chorus wanted to install UFB across our section,

 

.....

 

We wouldn't agree to have fibre fixed to our fence, because it breaches the covenants for our section and looks bad.

 

 

 That is interesting about covenants. I guess you would have to pay extra to have it done another way, as you had agreed to the covenants when you purchased it. It is one of the downsides of buying a property with covenants on it I have found, as it often ends up costing the homeowner more to comply with them. I don't think it would be reasonable for chorus to cover the extra costs of your covenants, as their install methods would comply with a house that didn't have covenants, and would be standard acceptable practice.  It is simialr to having power installed, some covenants require it to be installed underground, yet the cheapest way maybe to just have it overhead from the power pole. SO the homeowner pays more to get it put underground.

 

 

In a situation where Chorus need consent to take UFB across our section to service a neighbour's house, any extra cost of undertaking work in a way that is acceptable to us (for whatever reason) would be Chorus's problem.  Otherwise they simply wouldn't get consent.

 

Covenants are the norm in new subdivisions now and are publicly available information.  Arguably Chorus should be aware of the type and frequency of covenants in each areas they tender for UFB roll out in and cost in contingencies accordingly.





Mike

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.