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Topic # 31046 3-Mar-2009 01:45
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If you had to pay an installation cost - e.g. $2000 - to get the 'last mile' of fibre connected to your house, would you? 

It was pointed out by a friend in sweeden who has fibre and pays ridiculuoulsy low monthly costs that he had to pay an installation fee of about EUR1000 to get the fibre connected in the first place.  I'm not sure whether that means he owns that 'segment' of the network.





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  Reply # 198881 3-Mar-2009 07:46
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if the provider was offering top notch speed then hell yeah. if not .... well still likely

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  Reply # 198892 3-Mar-2009 08:54
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I would probably not be willing to pay very much for the simple fact that I would not expect any great increase in International speeds anyway.

I have a 14Mbit ADSL2+ sync at home but would never get close to this internationally because the international bandwidth just isnt there, so it wouldn't be much different to now.

I would be much happier paying say $10-15 more a month for my broadband if it meant that the international capacity was better (Ie. Buy more bandwidth on the SX cable.)

FTTH is certainly a cool idea, and needs to happen at home point, but I think that priority now should be improving the performnce of our international links. A 100Mbit fible link into my house really isn't that appealing to me if I can still only get 3 or 4 Mbits internationally anyway (Unless if someone perhaps comes out with a good IPTV offering).


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  Reply # 198893 3-Mar-2009 08:55
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$2000?  Yes (as long as the subsequent monthly internet charges were reasonable).

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  Reply # 198905 3-Mar-2009 10:22
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I would pay for the following plan:

If you took my existing plan, said "That's your international connection, the monthly
price is the same"
Throw in free local/national traffic.
Provided national traffic at 100mbps.
Provided local (ie, internal to Wellington) traffic at >100mbps (dare to hope for 1gbps!)

That would be kick-ass. :)  I'd drop a sizeable chunk of money to get that.  Probably up to 5k.

The 5k comes from how much it costs to get new plumbing from the road, new gas connection, new power meter/fusebox, etc.

Heck, availability of non-DSL broadband was a "requirement" on the last 3 houses I've rented/owned.






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  Reply # 198981 3-Mar-2009 15:51
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jpollock: I'd drop a sizeable chunk of money to get that.  Probably up to 5k.

The 5k comes from how much it costs to get new plumbing from the road, new gas connection, new power meter/fusebox, etc.

Heck, availability of non-DSL broadband was a "requirement" on the last 3 houses I've rented/owned.


I guess there is no reason why fibre shouldnt follow the same path as all the other services.  As you point out there is a cost associated with getting other services connected initially (including telecom's copper home lines).  It cost me $3K to get gas installed to my house.

As you also point out it can also become a 'feature' of a house that is for sale or rent.  Much like having gas already connected.  When we shifted business premesis one of the key requirements was access to fibre.




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  Reply # 198989 3-Mar-2009 16:14
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Thanks Regs for rephrasing my post in a much more intelligent way. ;)






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  Reply # 198993 3-Mar-2009 16:26
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jpollock: Thanks Regs for rephrasing my post in a much more intelligent way. ;)


lol, i should have just said "i agree with your post".  i really didnt add anything of value to it :p




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  Reply # 199036 3-Mar-2009 20:06
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Regs: If you had to pay an installation cost - e.g. $2000 - to get the 'last mile' of fibre connected to your house, would you? 


I would PLUS I would sleep on the couch for a month after my partner discovers what I'd "invested" 2k on...

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  Reply # 199084 3-Mar-2009 23:33
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I would probably pay $1000 after they install the cabinets so its only a shorter distance.
I would also be happy to pay an extra $20 a month if national speeds were better - eg. if my isp offered free traffic national traffic that went via a peering exchange. That would make me a very happy tvnz ondemmand user since I watch the 6pm news at about 11.30 each night.

Fibre to the Home would not make a 'feature' but not affect home values at all. There is certainly benefit to someone like us here, but not to the average house buyer.

edit: sorry - would make a feature but not affect the home value




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  Reply # 199102 4-Mar-2009 08:27
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raytaylor: I would probably pay $1000 after they install the cabinets so its only a shorter distance.
I would also be happy to pay an extra $20 a month if national speeds were better - eg. if my isp offered free traffic national traffic that went via a peering exchange. That would make me a very happy tvnz ondemmand user since I watch the 6pm news at about 11.30 each night.

Fibre to the Home would not make a 'feature' but not affect home values at all. There is certainly benefit to someone like us here, but not to the average house buyer.



In theory, you'd be able to easily stream it in 1080p over fibre. That would be cool.

Someone needs to come up with a cool IPVoD service where we can stream HD content to a STB or HTPC. That would make me spend the money, and would help stop movie piracy too I suspect.




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  Reply # 199223 4-Mar-2009 15:06
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adamj:
Someone needs to come up with a cool IPVoD service where we can stream HD content to a STB or HTPC. That would make me spend the money, and would help stop movie piracy too I suspect.


My guess is that SKY and Telecom will come up with an offering for that.  In the past you were able to buy SKY and Phone lines bundled together so IPVoD sounds like a logical next step for a collaboation.  It would be hard for other players to enter the market given SKYs near monopoly on content.




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  Reply # 199229 4-Mar-2009 15:19
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I recommend checking out boxee/XMBC (not on xbox!) along with a US VPN provider.

You get access to all their content (in 720p HD even) for free.

I believe it needs ~1mbps for SD content and 3mbps for HD.

Personally, I've managed to watch Hulu on an  xbox running XBMC through a DLNA server running on a Mac.  XBMC couldn't keep up with the HD content, but it seemed to manage mostly alright with the SD content.  The problem was mostly that my proxy (Amazon EC2) seems to be strictly limited to 1mbps. :)  Very cool.




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  Reply # 199324 5-Mar-2009 04:13
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I could get fibre into my flat here but TBH the additional utility over our existing ADSL2+ service is not justified by the extra cost (which is pretty marginal). I mean what can't you do on a 20mbps connection (alabit asynchronous) which the majority of the population (even those here) are going to be wanting to do?

Sure I can think of a couple of time when pushing large files around between mates where it could come in handy, but honestly I could just copy em to a spare external HDD, take them down the pub and give them to my mate there (whislt spending that extra few £ saved on a few pints).

Speaking from experience, you will find a lot of that content which you are oogeling over may not be as bottlenecked at the last mile as you may suspect. As people start spending more time at home on the net and telcos push back infrastructure investment you many find this is even more relevent in the short term.

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  Reply # 199337 5-Mar-2009 07:52
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I can already think of uses.

1) When I'm over at a friend's house, it would be great to have access to my DVD collection.  With Fibre and free local/national traffic, I could do this. (Could?  _Would_)
2) I used to stream my music from home to work.  That way, I didn't have to put my mp3s on my work machine (a big no-no).  The free national traffic made this viable.
3) I'd be able to do the same with my Cable TV, Sky, and Freeview feeds.
4) I'd be able to run my servers at home, instead of paying for hosting.
5) The no last-mile bottleneck (for now) would mean that I would be able to reliably get HD streaming content from the US, avoiding the need to pay for Sky/Telstra Clear
6) High Bandwidth and an always on server means that I don't need "the cloud" as much to make my content available.

And that's even without bringing out the "I could do the same stuff, but sell it to everyone else, from home!" garage business idea.




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  Reply # 199346 5-Mar-2009 08:29
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jpollock: I can already think of uses.

1) When I'm over at a friend's house, it would be great to have access to my DVD collection.  With Fibre and free local/national traffic, I could do this. (Could?  _Would_)
2) I used to stream my music from home to work.  That way, I didn't have to put my mp3s on my work machine (a big no-no).  The free national traffic made this viable.
3) I'd be able to do the same with my Cable TV, Sky, and Freeview feeds.
4) I'd be able to run my servers at home, instead of paying for hosting.
5) The no last-mile bottleneck (for now) would mean that I would be able to reliably get HD streaming content from the US, avoiding the need to pay for Sky/Telstra Clear
6) High Bandwidth and an always on server means that I don't need "the cloud" as much to make my content available.

And that's even without bringing out the "I could do the same stuff, but sell it to everyone else, from home!" garage business idea.


But most of these you can currently do with ADSL 2+ or are unsuitable for the type of application you are probably intending?

1) Granted this is not feasible over xDSL really without transcoding.
2) More than feasible over ADSL2+.
3) Granted this is not feasible over xDSL really without transcoding.
4) Most businesses with telehoused or hosted services do so for the higher SLAs which data centers provide, not solely for the additional network service options.
5) 720p MPEG4 content should be able to be streamed over the majority of ADSL2+ connections in NZ barring externalities from the last mile.
6) Care to clarify?


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