Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




5369 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2198


Topic # 173514 26-May-2015 11:15
Send private message

I'm talking about the high power offroad spots that MTB riders use.  Are they legal for on-road use?

A street I regularly dirve down at night is on the way back from a popular MTB ride.

At night riders are often returning along this street with their helmet spotlights on. Of course they automatically look at all oncoming cars.  I have never thought of this as more than a temporary nuisance, but the other day one happened to shine directly into my eyes and I was temporarily blinded. 

I stopped immediately, and waited there until I could see again - seemed like 30 seconds or so.  Quite scary.




Mike

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
735 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 174


  Reply # 1311916 26-May-2015 11:40
Send private message

I'd say they're not legal. But then I'm not sure how often or legal a lot of vehicle foglights are either and I see them used plenty.Either way I think it's safer for the cyclist to be seen and occasionally dazzle. People forget about high beam in cars too.

771 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 230


  Reply # 1311923 26-May-2015 11:50
2 people support this post
Send private message

Check out the discussion we had here a couple of years back - http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=162&topicid=124585
Key point from NZTA:
When considering lights it is important to be mindful that:

 

  • Headlights should be attached to handlebars and pointing down.
  • Your lights can be a hazard if used incorrectly. You must not use cycle lighting equipment in such a way that it dazzles, confuses, or distracts so as to endanger the safety of other road users.
I'd suggest calling *555 to report ANY vehicle causing issue on the road.

I'll get in early here and ask that this thread doesn't degenerate into the usual 'us vs them' mentality seen on other sites whenever cyclists are mentioned.  The last discussion went fairly well, hopefully this one can also.

Disclaimer - I bike to and from work every day, including at night.  I wear hi-viz, and have lights.  Last Friday I still had to take evasive action due to a vehicle 'undertaking' a stationary vehicle waiting to turn right, and overtaking me in the process, squeezing me right out of road.  I have a high-powered spot mounted on handlebars (it used to be on my helmet, but was a pain to fit each time), but find that the lowest setting works well enough on most roads.  It also makes my battery last a lot longer.

 
 
 
 


1508 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 213


  Reply # 1311929 26-May-2015 12:03
Send private message

I don't know about legality, but I just got one that dims if it has a light shine back into it. It is certainly enough to blind you if you shine the main spot into your eyes by accident.




Try Vultr using this link and get us both some credit:

 

http://www.vultr.com/?ref=7033587-3B


353 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 54


  Reply # 1311964 26-May-2015 13:19
Send private message

I've had this discussion before, this is from the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Lighting (2004)

Bikes as classed a Class AA, which is in Group A, which must comply with section 3.3

 

3.3(1) A dipped-beam headlamp on a motor vehicle (other than an unclassified motor vehicle, or a vehicle having a gross vehicle mass exceeding 12,000 kg) must be positioned at a height not exceeding 1.2 m from the ground.

4082 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1371


  Reply # 1311973 26-May-2015 13:25
Send private message

jfanning: I've had this discussion before, this is from the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Lighting (2004)

Bikes as classed a Class AA, which is in Group A, which must comply with section 3.3

3.3(1) A dipped-beam headlamp on a motor vehicle (other than an unclassified motor vehicle, or a vehicle having a gross vehicle mass exceeding 12,000 kg) must be positioned at a height not exceeding 1.2 m from the ground.



It depends on the definition of vehicle and headlamp.  From what I can tell, the headlamp is on the helmet, not the vehicle (bike).  

Technicalities like this are bread and butter for lawyers. 

4082 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1371


  Reply # 1311979 26-May-2015 13:27
Send private message

GregV: Check out the discussion we had here a couple of years back - http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=162&topicid=124585
Key point from NZTA:
When considering lights it is important to be mindful that:

 

  • Headlights should be attached to handlebars and pointing down.
  • Your lights can be a hazard if used incorrectly. You must not use cycle lighting equipment in such a way that it dazzles, confuses, or distracts so as to endanger the safety of other road users.

Are those recommendations on the website, or written law? 



4013 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2709

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1311982 26-May-2015 13:31
5 people support this post
Send private message

mudguard: I'd say they're not legal. But then I'm not sure how often or legal a lot of vehicle foglights are either and I see them used plenty.Either way I think it's safer for the cyclist to be seen and occasionally dazzle. People forget about high beam in cars too.


You're wrong. "occasionally dazzle" a driver in charge of a 1-2tonne death hunk of metal? What a totally stupid thing to suggest. The lights being talked about here are usually brighter (and more focussed) than car highbeams.

There's no question here, they are dangerous for on-road use and any other opinion is simply delusional. It would appear that they are also not legal as well - but I'm not as confident about the legality as I am about the danger and stupidity.

Cheers - N


353 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 54


  Reply # 1311984 26-May-2015 13:35
Send private message

surfisup1000:
jfanning: I've had this discussion before, this is from the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Lighting (2004)

Bikes as classed a Class AA, which is in Group A, which must comply with section 3.3

3.3(1) A dipped-beam headlamp on a motor vehicle (other than an unclassified motor vehicle, or a vehicle having a gross vehicle mass exceeding 12,000 kg) must be positioned at a height not exceeding 1.2 m from the ground.



It depends on the definition of vehicle and headlamp.  From what I can tell, the headlamp is on the helmet, not the vehicle (bike).  

Technicalities like this are bread and butter for lawyers. 


Well the vehicle is defined, it is a class A.  The cyclist is attached to the cycle, the helmet is attached to the cyclist.  So the Rule states for a class A vehicle (ie a Bike) the light must not be higher than 1.2m from the ground.  If you want to pay a lawyer to fight it, go for it, I would probably just pay the fine

13873 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6631

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1311993 26-May-2015 13:39
Send private message

surfisup1000:
GregV: Check out the discussion we had here a couple of years back - http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=162&topicid=124585
Key point from NZTA:
When considering lights it is important to be mindful that:

 

  • Headlights should be attached to handlebars and pointing down.
  • Your lights can be a hazard if used incorrectly. You must not use cycle lighting equipment in such a way that it dazzles, confuses, or distracts so as to endanger the safety of other road users.

Are those recommendations on the website, or written law? 




The best way to get an accurate answer would be to call the NZTA




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

Using empathy takes no energy and can gain so much. Try it.

 

 


224 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 22


  Reply # 1312004 26-May-2015 13:46
Send private message

MikeAqua: I'm talking about the high power offroad spots that MTB riders use.  Are they legal for on-road use?

A street I regularly dirve down at night is on the way back from a popular MTB ride.

At night riders are often returning along this street with their helmet spotlights on. Of course they automatically look at all oncoming cars.  I have never thought of this as more than a temporary nuisance, but the other day one happened to shine directly into my eyes and I was temporarily blinded. 

I stopped immediately, and waited there until I could see again - seemed like 30 seconds or so.  Quite scary.


30 Seconds, that must of been a very bright light.  Perhaps you can get in touch with NZTA and ask them to put a sign up at the end of the track asking riders to turn off or turn down their super bright head lamps.




14725 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1988


  Reply # 1312054 26-May-2015 14:40
Send private message

To me, it is no different from someone shining a torch at oncoming cars, or even a laser. I would be surprised if there wasn't a law about it. It is similar to cars leaving their lights on highbeam all the time.

14725 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1988


  Reply # 1312056 26-May-2015 14:42
Send private message

surfisup1000:
jfanning: I've had this discussion before, this is from the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Lighting (2004)

Bikes as classed a Class AA, which is in Group A, which must comply with section 3.3

3.3(1) A dipped-beam headlamp on a motor vehicle (other than an unclassified motor vehicle, or a vehicle having a gross vehicle mass exceeding 12,000 kg) must be positioned at a height not exceeding 1.2 m from the ground.



It depends on the definition of vehicle and headlamp.  From what I can tell, the headlamp is on the helmet, not the vehicle (bike).  

Technicalities like this are bread and butter for lawyers. 


When you are riding on the bike, aren't you then part of the bike (eg you are the bikes source of power)

771 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 230


  Reply # 1312065 26-May-2015 14:50
Send private message

I'd suggest calling *555 to report ANY vehicle causing issue on the road.

Worth repeating.  Not much is going to change by talking about it online after the fact.

735 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 174


  Reply # 1312081 26-May-2015 15:16
Send private message

Talkiet:
mudguard: I'd say they're not legal. But then I'm not sure how often or legal a lot of vehicle foglights are either and I see them used plenty.Either way I think it's safer for the cyclist to be seen and occasionally dazzle. People forget about high beam in cars too.


You're wrong. "occasionally dazzle" a driver in charge of a 1-2tonne death hunk of metal? What a totally stupid thing to suggest. The lights being talked about here are usually brighter (and more focussed) than car highbeams.

There's no question here, they are dangerous for on-road

Cheers - N



I'd say no more likely to dazzle than someone leaving their lights on high beam. Same with high powered fog lamps.
Go on a night ride once. You'll learn very quickly to control where your headlamp points. Easy to spot new riders lighting up fellow riders faces when stopped for a chat.

I can't find anything that suggests you can't use as bright lights as you want. Provided you're not using them in a manner that is a hazard. IE mounting them facing oncoming traffic.

111 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 8


  Reply # 1312102 26-May-2015 15:38
Send private message



I'd say no more likely to dazzle than someone leaving their lights on high beam. Same with high powered fog lamps.
Go on a night ride once. You'll learn very quickly to control where your headlamp points. Easy to spot new riders lighting up fellow riders faces when stopped for a chat.

I can't find anything that suggests you can't use as bright lights as you want. Provided you're not using them in a manner that is a hazard. IE mounting them facing oncoming traffic.


Definition of a headlamp for a cycle:

 

 

headlamp,—

(b) for a cycle, means a lamp that is—

 

(i) forward-facing; and
(ii) sufficiently brilliant to be visible in normal atmospheric conditions for a distance of at least 100 m when it is switched on

 


Note that it must be forward facing. Any other light to the front would be an optional light and as such illegal if the source of the light was visible. See  Lighting Rule 2004 10.9.

 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Orcon announces new always-on internet service for Small Business
Posted 18-Apr-2019 10:19


Spark Sport prices for Rugby World Cup 2019 announced
Posted 16-Apr-2019 07:58


2degrees launches new unlimited mobile plan
Posted 15-Apr-2019 09:35


Redgate brings together major industry speakers for SQL in the City Summits
Posted 13-Apr-2019 12:35


Exported honey authenticated on Blockchain
Posted 10-Apr-2019 21:19


HPE and Nutanix partner to deliver hybrid cloud as a service
Posted 10-Apr-2019 21:12


Southern Cross and ASN sign contract for Southern Cross NEXT
Posted 10-Apr-2019 21:09


Data security top New Zealand consumer priority when choosing a bank
Posted 10-Apr-2019 21:07


Samsung announces first 8K screens to hit New Zealand
Posted 10-Apr-2019 21:03


New cyber-protection and insurance product for businesses launched in APAC
Posted 10-Apr-2019 20:59


Kiwis ensure streaming is never interrupted by opting for uncapped broadband plans
Posted 7-Apr-2019 09:05


DHL Express introduces new MyDHL+ online portal to make shipping easier
Posted 7-Apr-2019 08:51


RackWare hybrid cloud platform removes barriers to enterprise cloud adoption
Posted 7-Apr-2019 08:50


Top partner named at MYOB High Achievers Awards
Posted 7-Apr-2019 08:48


Great ideas start in Gisborne with hackathon event back for another round
Posted 7-Apr-2019 08:42



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.