Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




573 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 3

Trusted

Topic # 13797 30-May-2007 01:27
Send private message

From Juha:


Telecom New Zealand is poised to award Alcatel-Lucent with a contract in excess of NZ$300-$400 million to build a GSM voice/EV-DO data 3G network. The official contract win is expected to be announced within ten days.

As foreshadowed by Telecom New Zealand executives in May, the carrier had been looking at a dual network 3G investment for some time and is understood to have considered detailed bids from Ericsson and China's ZTE in the RFP process. Industry sources have speculated however that the bid process was a "closed shop" with incumbent suppliers Alcatel-Lucent considered the only likely candidates.

CommsDay understands that a key requirement for the network build is compatibility with Lucent's Flexent hardware platform, and that the plan to go hybrid is still alive - GSM will be used for voice calls, and the existing CDMA2000 1xRTT Rev A protocol for data.

Alcatel-Lucent intends to use the capability it purchased from Nortel at the end of last year for the GSM network.

Telecom New Zealand is believed to have asked for an accelerated schedule for the GSM network deployment, and earlier reports say the CDMA part may in fact be turned off two years after it goes alive.

Ericsson is believed to have been dropped from the running by Telecom for cost reasons, but external relations manager Tom Clancy denies that the telco supplier is too expensive. "Our unique selling point is fairly clear actually - for a number of reasons, expertise, service, technology, we're the world leader for WCDMA/GSM deployments - as in we have the most commercial deployments in the world, which seems to refute the 'too expensive' claim actually," Clancy states.

Alcatel-Lucent's final network proposal is understood to have been the death-knell for TelstraClear's Unplugged 3G project in Tauranga, which was unexpectedly terminated in April. Sources claim that TelstraClear and Telecom were still in open discussions on the possibility of 3G network sharing but following TelstraClear's discovery of the scope of Telecom's 3G network strategy were compelled to pull out of the market and pursue a wholesale relationship instead. At the time TelstraClear publicly blamed Vodafone for the network closure claiming it had changed the terms of a national roaming agreement.

Telecom New Zealand was due to announce new pricing plans for international roaming today, but decided to postpone this until July. Sources claim that this was done to coincide with the GSM network announcement to give greater credibility to Telecom's roaming strategy. The incumbent is keen on getting a slice of the estimated NZ$200-300million inbound roaming market.

Meanwhile, the finalisation of Telecom New Zealand's 3G infrastructure investment also signals the expected withdrawal of the carrier's current commitment to the Hutchison 3G Australia relationship. Telecom New Zealand is obliged to inform the market in early June on whether it is going to tip in a further $300 million into the H3GA JV to uphold its original 19.9% shareholding. The remaining 80.1% stake is owned by Hutchison Telecommunications Australia.

At Telecom's Q3 results earlier in the month, CFO Marko Bogoievski said that while the decision had not be finalised, he didn't expect to retain that percentage level of investment. As reported by CommsDay at the time, it is widely anticipated that the carrier will withhold any further investment for its own infrastructure build out. "They do not need to retain a 19.9% stake in the company to have an agreement to use UMTS on both sides of the Tasman," one source close to the operators said. The most likely outcome will see Telecom's stake reduced to less than 10% with an agreement put in place for leveraging Hutchison's global handset buying power.

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9
3539 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 125

Trusted

  Reply # 72805 30-May-2007 10:19
Send private message

I see that the Herald have finally picked up this story and acknowledged Juha's blog:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/story.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=10442621&ref=rss

However, the link embedded in their story (back to Juha's blog) doesn't work -- Good One Harold Tongue out

Fex

23 posts

Geek


  Reply # 72834 30-May-2007 15:19
Send private message

Excelent news!! Cool

 
 
 
 


425 posts

Ultimate Geek


  Reply # 72837 30-May-2007 15:40
Send private message

I don't get why they'll still be using CDMA for data.  Presumably when the article says they'll be using GSM for voice, they mean UMTS/HSDPA.  So why not use that for data?

Also, because they'll be using CDMA for data, presumably they'll still be selling CDMA data cards.  So when people want to use these when traveling overseas in the next few years, they'll find it increasingly difficult to find an operator that runs CDMA.  This will also keep in place Vodafone's monopoly on GSM mobile broadband roaming - keeping prices per MB high.

Seems to be a confusing decision.



2366 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 13

Trusted
Spark

  Reply # 72841 30-May-2007 15:51
Send private message

JonC: I don't get why they'll still be using CDMA for data.  Presumably when the article says they'll be using GSM for voice, they mean UMTS/HSDPA.  So why not use that for data?

Also, because they'll be using CDMA for data, presumably they'll still be selling CDMA data cards.  So when people want to use these when traveling overseas in the next few years, they'll find it increasingly difficult to find an operator that runs CDMA.  This will also keep in place Vodafone's monopoly on GSM mobile broadband roaming - keeping prices per MB high.

Seems to be a confusing decision.




In relation to roaming, perhaps the implementation of world mode data cards would do the trick. I guess we will all find out more information when Telecom chooses to go public.
nzbnw







646 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 4


  Reply # 72842 30-May-2007 15:56
Send private message

Wise decision actually by using EVDO for data especially as if the CDMA network is only used for data they can provide a pretty compelling national data network for years to come and even when Voda release 900mhz EVDO Rev A and 0 have a superior foot print, in fact better than 1x. Its bloody good.

For WLL and rural broadband the EVDO solution might be a real option, word is they will jump to Rev C next anyway.

Leaving UMTS for voice and roaming and handset and mobiity based data solutions and EVDO for broadband only will give Telecom options a plenty for the future.

I love how they term it GSM, from all accounts this will be a WCDMA network with HSDPA (UMTS), unsure if they will put in GSM as well. Maybe they need to but why bother when most of the roamers eventually will be on WCDMA any way.





www.ultimatebroadband.co.nz 
Delivering better broadband services

UFB fibre, Rural fibre on EA networks, RBI wireless, Ruralnet & Ultra wireless, wireless networks


3539 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 125

Trusted

  Reply # 72853 30-May-2007 16:30
Send private message

mjsit&t: ...EVDO Rev A and 0 have a superior foot print, in fact better than 1x. Its bloody good.

I'm looking forward to trying out EVDO in a few days time to see how it goes in some remote areas.

Are there any Coverage Maps which show the extent of EVDO Rev A vs Rev 0 coverage?

I found one which mentioned "Mobile Broadband" but it wasn't clear whether that meant Rev A or Rev 0?

Any help appreciated.

2366 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 13

Trusted
Spark

  Reply # 72857 30-May-2007 16:42
Send private message

Not as such, but there are maps showing EVDO and the EVDO revA upgrade area(s).

See: http://www.telecom.co.nz/content/0,8748,204420-1066,00.html

EVDO Rev0 offers a good experience, and you should enjoy it.

nzbnw







Juha
1318 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 72864 30-May-2007 16:59
Send private message

Telecom has existing customers to look out for, and there's nothing much wrong at all with EV-DO Rev 0/A. We'll see what the final outcome is, but I'm guessing Telecom's in a real hurry to sort out voice roaming (in and outbound), so that takes priority over changing the data network.




BDFL - Memuneh
61774 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 12432

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

Reply # 72865 30-May-2007 17:20
Send private message

This is not much different from what Sprint is planning to do in the USA, with a hybrid technology network. Sprint plans to use CDMA EV-DO for voice and WiMax for data. Those are completely distinct technologies, exactly like CDMA and WCDMA.

I doubt there will be a GSM deployment, because this is old technology and not a pre-requisite for WCDMA deployment. I don't see a problem for people using handsets for data - most serious users would just go for an Express Card or USB modem, so those will be still be plenty around.





1200 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3

Trusted

  Reply # 72869 30-May-2007 17:55
Send private message


Hello Everyone,

Time to interrupt the discussion with a basic question. Everyone refers to GSM as the standard worldwide, but I understand the next revision is WCDMA?

So, does WCDMA completly replace GSM? If so, do people simply still refer to it as GSM to avoid confusion?

Is it still a requirement of the WCDMA spec to have SIM cards?

Does the WCDMA spec cover all the telephone routing etc, or is it simply a data network, which voice is a QoS overlay?

Hey - someones gotta ask the basic questions :-)




Tyler - Parnell Geek - iPhone 3G - Lenovo X301 - Kaseya - Great Western Steak House, these are some of my favourite things.

646 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 4


  Reply # 72870 30-May-2007 18:02
Send private message

Grant17:
mjsit&t: ...EVDO Rev A and 0 have a superior foot print, in fact better than 1x. Its bloody good.

I'm looking forward to trying out EVDO in a few days time to see how it goes in some remote areas.

Are there any Coverage Maps which show the extent of EVDO Rev A vs Rev 0 coverage?

I found one which mentioned "Mobile Broadband" but it wasn't clear whether that meant Rev A or Rev 0?

Any help appreciated.


The maps dont do the coverage justice. The new Aircard 595 and the 595 u due out next week are fair superior to the early 580 aircard from a performance point of view. Note with a magmount antenna you get ven better coverage, 20 -35 km away from enabled site (topography dependant) and the Yagi directional antenna even better and speeds & coverage is even better.

Yeah EVDO is hot and Telecom are commiting to this as a serious alturnative to cable based broadband services.






www.ultimatebroadband.co.nz 
Delivering better broadband services

UFB fibre, Rural fibre on EA networks, RBI wireless, Ruralnet & Ultra wireless, wireless networks


Juha
1318 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 72871 30-May-2007 18:07
Send private message

I can vouch for the 595 being an upgrade to the 580. Consistently better performance with it.




4159 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 760

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 72876 30-May-2007 18:30
Send private message

mjsit&t: Yeah EVDO is hot and Telecom are commiting to this as a serious alturnative to cable based broadband services.

This is an interesting idea. In the past I would have argued that Telecom would not want to push EVDO to the mainstream for fear of cannibalising their fixed line revenue, but LLU could change their strategy in this regard.

646 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 4


  Reply # 72877 30-May-2007 18:40
Send private message

alasta:
mjsit&t: Yeah EVDO is hot and Telecom are commiting to this as a serious alturnative to cable based broadband services.

This is an interesting idea. In the past I would have argued that Telecom would not want to push EVDO to the mainstream for fear of cannibalising their fixed line revenue, but LLU could change their strategy in this regard.


Thats what i would have said 12 mths ago. Atleast this way once they clear the 1x customers out long term they will have capacity to burn and the rev c upgrade will offer a really good solution through out the country. Plus they can price it as they please and it wont effect what they do with UMTS, effectively they could offer cheap broadband and even quite possibly Voip home WLL connections as well. who knows but they certainlyhave an advantage in holding on to the EVDO network. 

It is logical now and the new network will go nationwide, hence why they are doing a large site build program right now. They wont get caught short like they did with CDMA. this time i think they will launch with a pretty good foot print.





www.ultimatebroadband.co.nz 
Delivering better broadband services

UFB fibre, Rural fibre on EA networks, RBI wireless, Ruralnet & Ultra wireless, wireless networks


3539 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 125

Trusted

  Reply # 72880 30-May-2007 19:01
Send private message

nzbnw: Not as such, but there are maps showing EVDO and the EVDO revA upgrade area(s).

See: http://www.telecom.co.nz/content/0,8748,204420-1066,00.html

EVDO Rev0 offers a good experience, and you should enjoy it.

nzbnw

Thank you Sir, that is what I was after Smile.  I had found the EVDO map, but not the Rev A upgrade map.

It will be interesting to try the speeds within Hamilton's Rev A coverage area vs the Rev 0 coverage that I will be using most of the time at Fieldays.  Either way, it will leave GPRS in the dust Cool

 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.