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Topic # 27261 20-Oct-2008 10:38
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KDDI has announced that they will be launching a 1Gbps Internet service to single-family home and condo users in October. The service is supposedly synchronous, with 1Gbps in both directions, although the article implies that speeds will vary with location. Cost will be 5,985 yen/month (about US$56.50) for the basic Internet and IP phone service. This is intended to compete with NTT, who currently control over 70% of the Japanese FTTH market.

http://tech.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/09/27/1757211&from=rss

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  Reply # 172209 20-Oct-2008 10:50
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Ths problem with delivering this is that there is no way in the real world that users can ever experience internet connections anywhere near this speed. With the 1000Mbps speeds already available in Japan and even Singapore where DOCSIS3 cable delivers 100Mbps speeds the reality is these are only possible to local servers.

How do you give a user a 1000Mbps connection when the webserver they are connecting to is only on a 1000Mbps connection? Two users try and connect at once and you're suddenly down to 1/2 that. You're now got to factor in phyical properties such as HDD speeds and the fact that the PC an end users is using may not even be able to support anything close to Gigabit ethernet speeds despite having a Gigabit port.

And just FYI 1 Gigabit fibre connections are already available to residential users in Nelson. Coincidently this is also featured in the Dominion Post today so I'm guessing it'a alsmo on Stuff.




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  Reply # 172227 20-Oct-2008 12:11
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NZ's First 1000MB Fibre to Home for Development

Scoop Quote: New Zealand’s first 1000MB fibre to the home high speed information and communication system destined for Pelorus Sound’s ‘Kaiuma Park Estate’, Marlborough

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 172230 20-Oct-2008 12:19
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sbiddle: How do you give a user a 1000Mbps connection when the webserver they are connecting to is only on a 1000Mbps connection? ...


I think you meant to write: "... when the webserver they are connecting to is only on a 100Mbps connection?", right?

Anyway, this is not the point. I have a bunch of pages in the same bookmark folder and I often open all of them at once. Thus, multiple connections to multiple servers, each sitting on 100 Mbps or even 1 Gbps. Or I could have some torrents going on at the same time. Don't think that users won't find ways to fill 1 Gbps if you give it to them! Smile

This doesn't invalidate any of the other points in your posting, though.

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  Reply # 172231 20-Oct-2008 12:26
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foobar:
sbiddle: How do you give a user a 1000Mbps connection when the webserver they are connecting to is only on a 1000Mbps connection? ...


I think you meant to write: "... when the webserver they are connecting to is only on a 100Mbps connection?", right?

Anyway, this is not the point. I have a bunch of pages in the same bookmark folder and I often open all of them at once. Thus, multiple connections to multiple servers, each sitting on 100 Mbps or even 1 Gbps. Or I could have some torrents going on at the same time. Don't think that users won't find ways to fill 1 Gbps if you give it to them! Smile

This doesn't invalidate any of the other points in your posting, though.


Oops yes I meant a server sitting on a 100Mbps connection, which is the reality for many many servers sitting on the net right now.

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  Reply # 172233 20-Oct-2008 12:43
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Whether 100Mbps or 1000Mbps these servers would hardly be sitting there for only one client.

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  Reply # 172258 20-Oct-2008 15:17
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Not really a far comparison considering Japan has ~127 million people vs our ~4.3 million.  More population = more money to invest in infrastructure.

Kiwis need to start breeding like rabbits, we can then get insanely quick internet Tongue out

/my $0.02

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  Reply # 172277 20-Oct-2008 15:43
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nate: Not really a far comparison considering Japan has ~127 million people vs our ~4.3 million.  More population = more money to invest in infrastructure.

Kiwis need to start breeding like rabbits, we can then get insanely quick internet Tongue out

/my $0.02

Doesn't New Zealand have one of the highest rates of fertility?

I don't think that providing blistering fast network speeds is going to be a simple solution. Most of that will definitely be underutilised, unless you make thousands of connections, which will probably overload a server anyway.


1Gbps in New Zealand... I wish! (in terms of residential connections)

I would settle for something like VDSL2 speeds (30-50mbps would be enough for the next 5-10 years in my view)




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  Reply # 172280 20-Oct-2008 15:52
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It will be available on Tuesday.

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  Reply # 172282 20-Oct-2008 15:57
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You have to go to the fibre  http://www.digitalnation.co.nz/products.html

User creativity, educational and artist development that would result would be so new that it would make the world wide web look like usenet.


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  Reply # 172293 20-Oct-2008 16:10
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The reason Japanese ISPs can do that is most Japan's content comes from Japan. It would be fantastic if New Zealand did the same. ISP's in NZ can't just peer at each of the peering exchanges and call it done, more than 70% of our traffic comes internationally. The bandwith cost for that is many times more expensive, which is why it will be some time before we see speeds or prices close to that.

As for being able to deliver that speed inside the country? The infrastructure is already there - there is just not many people using it. This is why initially national data wasn't capped or counted as a smaller percentage however was pulled due to a number of reasons not related to cost. If you follow the threads abut ISPs at the moment some will be experiencing International issues, while none should be experiencing issues shifting data around the country.

The capacity is there, just NZ internet users don't have much use for it. Most of the content we want is overseas, even if it means we twiddle our thumbs while it buffers.




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  Reply # 172365 20-Oct-2008 20:32
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nate: Not really a far comparison considering Japan has ~127 million people vs our ~4.3 million.  More population = more money to invest in infrastructure.

Kiwis need to start breeding like rabbits, we can then get insanely quick internet Tongue out

/my $0.02


... more population also = more people to serve. More people does not mean more money to invest in infrastructure per person, which is the relevant part. So now you might say, well, they have a higher population density - true - but statistics about broadband penetration/cost/speed show that density matters squat all (sorry, don't have the figures or charts on hand).

The reason we don't have these speeds is Telecom, plain and simple. Network infrastructure is a natural monopoly. No sane company is going to come in and start building a new network covering the country when Telecom already has one. Nothing to do with population or population density.

The reason we don't have these speeds nationally is due to horrible peering agreements (or, more importantly, lack thereof), which is again thanks to Telecom.

(Note: I'm not trying to bash Telecom here, just saying that they hold the natural monopoly on broadband infrastructure. Any other company would act the same).

This is why the government needs to step in big time. Would you want the road network run by private companies (that'll cost you only $1.00 to travel down this street, thanks)?

(Hint: the reason Japan's internet is where it is today is due to ... drum roll please! ... Huge government investment!)

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Reply # 172370 20-Oct-2008 20:47
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Hint: Where does most of the internet for the Japanese people come from?

While its great trying to troll and to have an agenda, lets face facts: We are a small country who gets most of its content from overseas sites. We don't have any countries linked to us, so the only way to communicate is effectively an underwater fiber optic cable... which costs a bit.

We are also a country that loves to whine: Damn heavy taxes, damn broadband (I want my $5 for 4000mbps no cap internet so I can pirate tv shows!), damn all blacks losing that world cup, damn nanny state....

This has been discussed time and time again... with a similar result.




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  Reply # 172372 20-Oct-2008 20:52
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cokemaster: Hint: Where does most of the internet for the Japanese people come from?

While its great trying to troll and to have an agenda, lets face facts: We are a small country who gets most of its content from overseas sites. We don't have any countries linked to us, so the only way to communicate is effectively an underwater fiber optic cable... which costs a bit.

We are also a country that loves to whine: Damn heavy taxes, damn broadband (I want my $5 for 4000mbps no cap internet so I can pirate tv shows!), damn all blacks losing that world cup, damn nanny state....

This has been discussed time and time again... with a similar result.


That's irrelevant to the fact that we dont have FTTH or even FTTN. When you take international stuff out of the picture, you're still left with NZ having a terrible national network. Give your argument when we have a decent national infrastructure first.

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  Reply # 172374 20-Oct-2008 20:56
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Again, look at Japan... how many people live in 10 square kilometers? Compare that to NZ...

The reality is that while underinvestment may have played some part, its not the end all when it comes to this topic. Look at Austrialia, look at the US... many places only have the option of DSL, some get DSL2+, some are more luckier.

From memory the new cabinets that are being rolled out are fiber fed... isn't that FTTN?




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  Reply # 172375 20-Oct-2008 21:04
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cokemaster: Again, look at Japan... how many people live in 10 square kilometers? Compare that to NZ...

The reality is that while underinvestment may have played some part, its not the end all when it comes to this topic. Look at Austrialia, look at the US... many places only have the option of DSL, some get DSL2+, some are more luckier.

From memory the new cabinets that are being rolled out are fiber fed... isn't that FTTN?


As I said in my first post, population density has been shown to have little impact on broadband (why? I don't know, but there you go).

Both Australia and the US have also suffered due to underinvestment... so I'm not sure what your point is there.

Yes, the new cabinets are FTTN, but it's (far) too little (far) too late.

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